Osage Orange (Maclura pomifera) seeds

(1 customer review)

$3.95

Family: Mulberry (Moraceae)

Hardy to Zones 4 to 10

(Bow Wood, Hedgeapple, Orange, Osage)  Deciduous, dioecious tree to 60 feet. Perfectly cold hardy. Native to south-central North America, now widely spread, although most trees in the western United States are very old.  Tree is not self-fertile, it is dioecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but only one sex is to be found on any one plant). Both male and female plants must be grown if seed is required.  We normally plant things of this nature in 3s.  The brainlike, bright green fruit of this dense and thorny tree has a long-lived reputation of repelling spiders and other insects. Avoid getting white sap in eyes. Wood extremely flexible and durable for bow-making and fenceposts. Major hedgerow component, wildlife shelter–strange and oddly beautiful. Personal favorite. Tree withstands wide range of soil types and rainfall. Sow in fall or early spring for germination as the ground warms up. If season is already advanced, soak seeds overnight and place in moist peat moss in fridge for 3 weeks, then sow warm.  Seedlings quickly acclimatize after transplanting.

Packet contains 30 seeds
10 g contains ~250 seeds
Open Pollinated, Untreated, NO GMO’s

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  1. rebekahwaller

    Success!

    rebekahwaller (verified owner)

    I have had great success germinating these seeds! Great quality! They are now about nine inches tall in nursery pots 🙂 very pleased

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      ok, this is now on my planting list!

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    • brandonguergo

      Wonderful to find this. I got into bow making here in Florida, have been trying to find this lumber all over. Unfortunately I don’t have the space, but I absolutely must grow these anyway.

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Brandon, I have a couple of large trunks that I cut out of one of our older trees that blew over in a storm. They’ve been curing under the shed roof for 2 years now. I wonder if they would work for you? r

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    • brandonguergo

      I’m not an experienced bowyer, but from my book, usually the tree is felled, then split into four staves and allowed to cure, I believe ideally removing all the bark and light sapwood first. I’m sure some usable bows could be made from large trunks though! Might be expensive to ship cross country… What a remarkable tree. Especially the grain and color.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      right, thanks for sharing, we also have a good supply of potted trees on this. enjoy!

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