Plants ordered now will ship Spring 2020.

Hawthorn, English (Crataegus oxyacantha/laevigata) potted tree

(10 customer reviews)

$15.00$40.00

Family: Rose (Rosaceae)

Hardy to zone 4 to 8

Deciduous thorny bush to small tree to 20 feet.  Native to Europe.  Traditional use (TWM):  Maladies of the heart.  Plants prefer full sun to part shade and water.  Well-suited to clay soils. Shelterbelt, landscape tree, hedgerow, living fence.  This is the prettiest of the Hawthorns, with pink or red flowers and showy autumn color.  The fruits are excellent.  Unless planting closely for a hedge, space trees 30 feet apart.

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5 out of 5 stars

10 reviews

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What others are saying

  1. Question

    Melissa Munoz

    How closely should I plant for a hedgerow? This would me decide how many to purchase.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Melissa,
      This depends on many factors–you could do 5 feet apart.
      Richo

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  2. Question

    Kevin Jaramillo

    Hello I hope all is well. Just wanted to know what size these three hawthorn trees would be and if they come with any guarantee?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Kevin,
      Thank you, all is well! The page you’re posting from has a picture of the english hawthorn population we’d be pulling from to send you your tree. They are 3 year olds 18 inches tall. Guarantees are for people who think the plants might not grow– concentrate more on being a horticulturalist and providing the most robust plants possible. Feel free to get into our nice organic stock. It will work well for you! Richo

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  3. Question

    Shanny Davis

    I live in Pinedale Wyoming zone 4a, will the hawthorn grow here?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Shanny, Yes, you’re within the zone. richo

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  4. Sue Donovan

    Strictly Medicinal Product Quality is OUT OF THIS WORLD

    Sue Donovan (verified owner)

    I ordered two Hawthorn Trees and was so impressed by how my two trees were packaged and shipped to me, but completely blown away by the quality of the Hawthorn Trees and every product I have ever bought from Strictly Medicinals. Thank you Richo!

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  5. Question

    allisonkosborne

    Will this be okay being sent to Zone 7A right now? We are experiencing 75-90F days and I’m worried about it being too warm for the plants. Thank you!

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Potted hawthorn are pretty stable–they can be planted anytime spring through fall.

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    • Jan Henry

      I am in zone 4. Will this winter?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Yes, this is listed to Zone 4 to 8 and if you summer plant the tree will have tome to root in and bud before winter sets in.

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  6. Question

    Sarah Anderson

    I live in the high desert of West Texas and have a small (irrigated) vineyard. One of my agricultural sources (who farms in Europe) has recommended planting English Hawthorn in vineyards. Do you think the Hawthorn would do well in my Zone 8 dry climate?. Thanks!

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Sarah,
      The hawthornes we have right now are about as good as I’ve ever seen go out of this nursery. They are listed up to zone 8, so you should be fine.
      Richo

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  7. Question

    will

    which cultivar is this?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      These are not a cultivar, they are a native land race, they are seedgrown

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    • Carter F Smith

      How old/large are these?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      3 or 4 years from seed

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    • aprilheyse

      Which hawthorn would you consider the best medicinal species for the heart?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Either Crataegus monogyna or C. oxyacantha/laevigata

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  8. Question

    Kevin H. (verified owner)

    What PH does the Midland Hawthorn prefer? Also does it prefer to be well drained? Does it like wet, medium, or dry conditions?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Slightly acidic garden soils, well-drained and of medium moisture content.

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    • Eliza

      How tall do they get? Do you need to prune them every year? Thanks!

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Eliza,
      They grow to 20 to 25 feet. Generally the more you prune them, the more suckers you get. If you are making a hedge with them, then prune so that they get multi-stemmed and impenetrable. If you are planting as a showpiece to the landscape, then do not prune–the single trunk is best and it will grow up and fountain over in a most comely manner.
      Richo

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  9. Question

    Tina

    How large is this plant when you ship? How big will this tree grow? Will it flower from Spring to Summer? Thanks

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      hi tina, the trees are around 18 inches tall when we ship. they grow up to 60 feet or so unless kept cut back. they flower in the spring only.

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  10. Question

    faehollow3 (verified owner)

    Hello! I just ordered this and I live in the mountains of Virginia. I was wondering if I should plant this once I get it outdoors right away or if I should plant in a pot and keep indoors during this first winter? I have the same question about the Witch Hazel potted trees I purchased and the Purple Willow. I really appreciate your advice! Thank you!

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello there, Trees of this sort do not like to live indoors for the winter. They set buds that require cold temperatures to hold through dormancy and then they put on new growth in the spring. Trees are best planted and mulched. richo

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  11. Question

    April

    What is the best time of year to plant these in zone 6A?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello April,
      In nature, the Hawthorn berries fall from the trees in the fall, are buried by leaves, and come up in the spring. In domestic culture, the same as in nature, the time to plant them is in the fall, for germination in the spring.
      Best regards,
      Richo

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  12. Question

    Lora

    Which of your Hawthorns bear the largest fruit?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      That would be the Crataegus monogyna but to be fair the Chinese Hawthorn “C. pinnatifida var. major” has truly huge fruits. Whether they are ounce-per-ounce as potent as our monogyna, I doubt. Anyway, here is a great youtube on the subject of Chinese hawthorn by my friend Joe Hollis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lb6Uz5y_sd8
      Richo

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  13. 1 out of 2 people found this helpful

    Question

    Carolyn G Duncan

    I am interested in knowing if this tree Crataegus oxyacantha will be available in the Spring?

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Yes, thank you for asking, we will have both Crataegus oxyacantha and C. monogyna available in the spring. r

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    • One person found this helpful

      Bill

      What size do you sell, and how long beforejt flowers? Thanks.

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Our hawthorns are around 18 inches tall without the pot. If grown in the right circumstances of sun, soil and moisture, trees can bush out significantly in the first 5 years and will be fruit productive by then.

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    • Lorie

      oxyacantha/laevigata which is it they are not the same I’m looking forOxyacantha!

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      I consider oxyacantha and laevigata to be interchangeable Latin names for the same tree–English Hawthorne, which is what we do have. From Wickipedia: Linnaeus introduced the name Crataegus oxyacantha for a species of Northern European Hawthorn[1] and the name gradually became used for several similar species which were assumed to be the same, particularly the Midland Hawthorn C. laevigata and the Common Hawthorn C. monogyna. In 1946 Dandy showed that Linnaeus had actually observed and described a single-styled species similar to the Common Hawthorn,[2] and the Midland Hawthorn was effectively a later discovery. However, Byatt showed that confusion over the true identity of C. oxyacantha remained,[3] and the name was formally rejected as ambiguous by the International Botanical Congress.[2] More recently, Christensen concluded[4] that the species studied by Linnaeus matches C. rhipidophylla Gand., a relatively rare species.

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