We are taking a break from the heat.  We will resume shipping plants starting in September.  Feel free to pre-order plants for your fall garden.  First come, first served.

Aloe vera plant, yellow flowered, organic

$20.00

Family: Aloe (Asphodelaceae)

Hardy to Zone 9 to 10, but commonly grown as a potted plant kept indoors or on the summer patio (shade)

Aloe Vera is a perennial succulent which came originally from the Island of Socotra in the Arabian Sea.  These beautiful, soft and edible aloes prosper in the gentle light from almost any window.  Their leaves are thick, spotted in white, spines rubbery and harmless, leaves filled with thick gel.  These plants flower yellow.  Space plants 1 to 2 feet apart.

Potted Plant Certified Organically Grown, will be bare-rooted to ship

In stock

Share your thoughts!

Let us know what you think...

What others are saying

  1. Question

    Pablo G

    Is this an aloe barbadensis Stockton miller?

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      This is the same plant that used to be called that but is now recognized by taxonomists as Aloe vera.

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Gintas

      is the juice of this Aloe vera plant is sweet?

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Gintas,
      No, the juice of aloes is bitter.
      Richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Gintas

      Richo, my deep respect to you. Same question about Aloe arborescens – is the juice of this plant sweet? As Ayurveda allow to use bitter juice for outside using, sweet juice – Inside using

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Gintas, Aloe arborescens juice is very bitter! You know, really, all aloes are going to be bitter, due to the presence of aloin, a very bitter principle.
      It is possible that if only the gel is extracted, and not the yellow anthraquinone constituent that occurs just below the skin of the leaf, that a sweet taste might be achieved. But for all practical purposes, aloes are bitter. Richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Gintas

      Thank you Richo for your patient, I try to ask the same in other words – which of Aloe (you have) is sweetest?

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Aloe ellenbeckii

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Gintas

      Yes Richo, I am going to use only gel w/o skin. My source told me that I should select Indian Aloe Barbadensis. I am little bit confused with Aloe Barbadensis and Aloe Vera. Some sources confirming it is the same plant, some – not. Do you have experience in preparing aloe juice according Ayurvedic principles for inner using? My respect. Gintas

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello gintas, yes, you would filet the large, juicy leaf and keep the gel and discard the skin. This would make it “sweeter.” The directions for doing this are on page 105 of “Making Plant Medicine” 4th edition. As for confusion with Aloe vera, the plant, and the naming of the plant, this is understandable. You can check my blog on the subject at this link https://blog.strictlymedicinalseeds.com/origins-of-aloe-vera/
      Beyond the blog, I think what your practitioner is recommending, is the larger and more upright form of the plant, sometimes misnomered “barbadensis.” (the plant didn’t originate in barbados, or india, for that matter, although it may be grown in these places). The other form of the plant is the “chinese” type that most people have, which is spotted and droopy. I have both types here, and they can generally be found at local nurseries. richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

  2. Question

    Sarah Drake

    Hi! Will there be any organic aloe vera again?

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Yes, thanks for asking, these will be enabled later on in the year. r

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Deborah Plaza (verified owner)

      I’d like to use it by cutting a little bit every day for use on my face.
      Will it kill the plant?

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      No, harvest the older, lower leaf not the central rosette and you’ll be fine. most of us do this, the older leaves will eventually slough off anyway.

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

×

Login

Register

A password will be sent to your email address.

Continue as a Guest

Don't have an account? Sign Up