Basil, Tree (Ocimum suave), packet of 30 seeds, organic

(1 customer review)

$3.95

Family:  Mint (Lamiaceae)
Zones 10 and up, otherwise grown as an annual or potted up and brought in for the winter.  These do overwinter indoors easily.

(Mtule Basil, African Tree Basil)  Woody perennial native to Africa.  We now have 3-year old specimens that have woody trunks and have climbed to 12 feet tall.  This plant originally found on the Zanzibar archipelago and brought to the US and put under organic cultivation in the year 1998.  This is a handsome, upright African bush basil that becomes woody with age.  Within its native range, the arching, reddish seedheads are a common sight throughout the wildlands.  The plant is similar to but taller than Vana Tulsi (Ocimum gratissimum) and is very high in Eugenol.  Eugenol is oil of clove, and interestingly the local use of tree basil follows the same use that is commonly employed for oil of clove–as an antiseptic and pain reliever for dental woes.  Among other uses, local people give the fresh leaves to children to allay pain of teething.  Plant prefers full sun and is not picky about soil, growing well in regular garden soil or roadside soils.  Sow in spring.  Germination is rapid.

30 Seeds/pkt, Certified Organically Grown

In stock

SKU: PBASIMT Categories: ,

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  1. One person found this helpful
    Phyllis Clay

    I’m glad I found Mtule.

    Phyllis Clay (verified owner)

    I love your site because you share so much detail about the origin and cultivation of the seeds that you sell. I have grown African Nunum for two years and am trying Mtule for the first time. African Nunum is said to have been brought to US by someone from Ghana. Mtule was originally found on the Zanzibar archipelago. I’ve researched that they are both of the species Ocimum gratissimum. It will be interesting to witness how they grow I. My yard this summer!

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hi phyllis, that is a good experiment you’ve got going and THANK YOU for knowing that there can be several varietals in a genus and species–so many people are confused by that. I think you’ll find mtule to have smaller leaves than the ghanaian form, although as far as I can tell the flowers are identical. richo

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    • Michael Monaghan

      Hi Richo
      Here in North Carolina, just moved from Seattle. Wondering how Mtule will grow in North Carolina?
      Mike

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Michael, well that’s a big change, coast to coast. mtule will grow in the north carolina summer, it is hot and humid there. if you’re in the mountains, it grows reasonably well there as well. richo

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