Angelica, Official (Angelica archangelica) seeds, organic

(3 customer reviews)

$3.95$20.10

Family:  Carrot (Apiaceae)

Hardy to Zones 4 to 8

Biennial native to temperate Europe, Siberia and the Himalayan Mountains.  Cultivated worldwide.  Traditional usage (TWM): Bitter aromatic, antimicrobial and carminative. Flowers green-yellow in the second year to a height of 3 feet.  Plant prefers full sun to part shade and moist soil.  Cold stored seed.  Short-lived seed.  Press these light dependent germinators into surface of soil and keep cool and moist.  A bit slow to start at first, but then fast growing.  Space plants 2 to 3 feet apart.

Packet contains 50 seeds
5 g contains ~1,000 seeds
10 g contains ~2,000 seeds

Certified Organically Grown

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5 out of 5 stars

3 reviews

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What others are saying

  1. Question

    jeannagv

    Hi, I live in zone 6b. Do you think mid june might be too late to plant these? Maybe start indoors to provide the cooler soil for germination? Thanks

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hi! a biennial like this will do fine started anytime. One sets the seedlings to field, they overwinter and make flowers in the spring. yes, they may be readily started indoors, potted up and left in the shade, and transplanted in the autumn when the garden cools down. We are currently offering really nice potted ones, too, if you want to go that route. r

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    • jeannagv (verified owner)

      Hi Ricoh, I love watching things grow from seeds or cuttings and just received my seed order – thanks! It’s getting warm here. Can you share any advice about a temp that is cool enough to encourage germination of these babies in time to move them out for fall planting and overwintering? Thanks, Jeanna

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hi jeanna and thanks for contacting. these will do fine if pressed into the surface of a shallow flat and kept at around 70 degrees f. the 40/70 oscillation is even better, but that can’t easily be attained at this time of year. yes, we did this ourselves last year, started them in the summer with standard greenhouse technique, overwintered them in pots and set to field in early spring. they didn’t flower but they’re big–really big–and that bodes well. r

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    • One person found this helpful

      jeannagv (verified owner)

      Thanks Richo, I’ll do my best for these little seeds. A relative told me that he recalls a family member who was know for pickling all sorts of fruits and vegetables including the stems of Angelica. Hope I get that far. Thanks for sharing your experience, be well. Jeanna

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  2. 5 out of 5 people found this helpful
    Cena Ewert

    Mine is coming up!

    Cena Ewert

    I am so excited my Angelica is coming up! And growing fast now.

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  3. One person found this helpful
    logan5446

    Good Angelica Seed Can Be Hard to Find

    logan5446 (verified owner)

    If you want to actually grow angelica, get your seeds here. If you want something to compost into your soil, due to lack of viability, go elsewhere. The smell (the 2nd season) of the flowers is like a floral approximation of honey. Very beautiful and pervasive, even though the flowers themselves are unassuming. The roots (prior to flowering) are fantastic, at least in my experience, for upper respiratory infections. Indispensable for distillers of fine spirits and certainly has a place in regular old brewing as well. For ease of harvest, try using 5+ gal smart pots. (though I have seen one happy in a smaller container too) A bit finicky about transplanting.

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  4. 3 out of 3 people found this helpful
    blick002

    blick002

    Good germination indoors and transplant survival into average garden soil. Survived two zone 3 winters and are the first up in the herb garden each spring. They also reseeded after flowering their second year…a nice surprise!

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