Aloe marlothii (Mountain Aloe), packet of 20 seeds

$3.95

Family:  Asphodel (Asphodelacea)

Hardy to Zone 7 to 12, otherwise grown as a potted plant indoors or on the summer patio.

(Mountain Aloe)  Large, single-stemmed succulent to 15 feet tall, native to South Africa, Swaziland, Botswana, and Mozambique.  The rosette produces a candleabra of up to 30 racemes of yellow-orange, tubular inflorescences.  This is the archetypical aloe, towering majestically, with densely prickled, large, boat-shaped leaves on a strong stem. The plant is impenetrable, and often planted to form living fences. As a potted plant, very showy, long-lived and full of blunt spines.

20 Seeds/pkt., Open Pollinated

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  1. Question

    hope4thepride (verified owner)

    I’ve had good success germinating the seeds in the way you described (cactus mix, sand, pumice) – the little cuties are about 3 weeks old now – I had them on a heat mat (approx 75-80 degrees) for the first couple weeks, and I have them under relatively intense light (two 4 foot, full spectrum LED lamps, 2 bulbs each, approx 18 inches above seedlings)) – I water them almost daily, but very sparingly, just enough to moisten the pumice and their little root zone a bit…. they are beginning to look a little less vibrantly green and I’m wondering what you might suggest? Reluctant to let them completely dry at this tender young age, but also concerned that they may be getting too much water, too much light, both?

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello! This looks like a really clean setup. The transition from germination under lights to growth in a more natural setting is always chancy and any deterioration of plants under lights is a sign that more true sunlight is needed. Make sure there is good air movement and reduce watering somewhat. Make sure you cycle the lights 12 hours on and 12 hours off and move the seedlings to real light when you get a chance. Richo

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    • hope4thepride (verified owner)

      Light cycle is on 13 1/2 hrs to simulate early spring day length…

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    • hope4thepride (verified owner)

      Thanks for your quick reply! I will try putting the least happy of them in a south-facing window and keep my fingers crossed – is it very easy to overwater them, i.e. would I be better off giving them a little more water every other day than just a pinch every day?

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      There are many variables involved in watering, but I see you’re using a Cactus mix so we’ll go with that. I tend to water aloe seedlings once every three days, deeply. That way they have 2 days to throw their roots deeper, then one day to turge up. In general succulents like an occasional, deep watering. Any darkening or sign of rubberiness means stop watering alltogether for awhile until they recover. my best guess. keep going.

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    • hope4thepride (verified owner)

      Thanks so much – it means everything to me that I can tell you love the plants like I do – your work, advice, and spirit (not necessarily in that order, haha) are priceless! Glad to walk this path with you (or perhaps a little behind you 🙂 J

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