Wild Yam, Chinese (Dioscorea batatas), live aerial tubers, organic [INTL NO]

$4.95$10.00

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Family:  Yam (Dioscoreaceae)

Hardy to Zones 4 to 8.

(Shan-yao, Cinnamon Vine, Wild Yam, Chinese Wild Yam) (Syn. Dioscorea opposita) Perennial dioecious vine.   Does well in pots. In the humid evenings and mornings, the flowers exude a rich Cinnamon fragrance.  The underground and aerial tubers are eaten and are delicious–bake or slice thinly and fry on a pan.  Oh, yum, yum.  Direct seed in rich soil or plant in pots fall, spring, or summer.  I find that the best method is to press the aerial tuber, which is about the size of a chickpea, into the surface of the soil but not covered by soil.  The tuber will push down into the dirt and a sprout will eventually emerge to the side.  I tried this again this year, using a deep flat in the greenhouse, and yesterday tugged on the tubers, and they had all extended down into the medium and were locked in place.  One has a new sprout coming up.  This whole process can take months.  Nature is not in a hurry, at least not on human terms, and patience is golden.

Aerial tubers, Certified Organically Grown  {SORRY, NO INTERNATIONAL SALES}

 

 

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  1. Question

    Marikyn Nardini-Smith

    How does one propagate the Chinese Yam Tuber?

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    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      OK, I see that the directions were rather thin, and I often do this when the starting material is obviously alive and the propagation technique is going to be dependent on the zone, the conditions in the particular garden, and the patience and experience of the propagator–all variables. I added some more text which hopefully will be helpful:  Direct seed in rich soil or plant in pots fall, spring, or summer.  I find that the best method is to press the aerial tuber, which is about the size of a chickpea, into the surface of the soil but not covered by soil.  The tuber will push down into the dirt and a sprout will eventually emerge to the side.  I tried this again this year, using a deep flat in the greenhouse, and yesterday tugged on the tubers, and they had all extended down into the medium and were locked in place.  One has a new sprout coming up.  This whole process can take months.  Nature is not in a hurry, at least not on human terms, and patience is golden.
      Richo

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      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

  2. Question

    Tim

    What is the best way to tell the difference between the vine of a Chinese wild yam and the vine of a Japanese wild yam? How long dose it usually take for the Chinese wild yam to begin to flower after it emerges from the ground the 2nd year?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hi Tim,
      The Chinese wild yam has a wider leaf than the Japanese. They look really similar–differentiation is all leaf shape as far as I know. Mine are already flowering in June in the greenhouse. They usually flower midsummer when outdoors. They don’t call it cinnamon vine for nothin’, the smell is like the finest Ceylon cinnamon.

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