Plants ordered now will ship OCTOBER 2021.
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Valerian, Homestash (Valeriana officinalis), potted plant, organic

(1 customer review)

$5.00

Family: Valerian (Valerianaceae)

Hardy to Zones 4 to 8.

Homestash is our original valerian cultivar that we have been growing for 30 years on our farm.  The seed is from our own production.  Homestash is highly root productive in season, and the activity is very dependable.  The original stock came from:  England.  Herbaceous perennial native to Europe and temperate Asia.  Traditional usage (TWM): sedative.  Valerian prefers full sun to part shade and moist but well-drained soils.  I have seen excellent clumps form, during a wet spring, on the peak of a pile of ground pumice.  However, regular garden soil amended with organic compost will do nicely.  The plant adapts rather well to a wide range of conditions. Space plants 1 to 2 feet apart.  Flowers white in the second year to a height of 5 feet or more.

Potted Plant., Certified Organically Grown

In stock

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5 out of 5 stars

1 review

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What others are saying

  1. Kathryn

    Love that stash!

    Kathryn

    I grew from seed 3 years ago..This past spring- I dug up- divided into 3 plants. 2 on the north side. One on the south side of the property..Plants are happy and blooming!!! I saved lots of roots – during the divide and made a tinture.

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  2. Question

    Justin (verified owner)

    I ordered one a couple years ago, and absolutely loved it. Early the following spring, something else absolutely loved it as well, and ate every part of it. Do you think it was a deer or a smaller critter?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Justin, That’s really the way of it, a great plant can be gone in a minute. Oftentimes what happens is that the plant is in rich soil (not only because it was rich when you planted it, but because the plant itself enriches the soil) and earthworms are attracted, and then a large burrowing rodent (mole) goes after the worms and the plant is collaterally damaged. Or, if you find an animal thereabouts in deep and uninterruptable slumber, then that would be your culprit. Richo

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