Tulsi, Vana — Holy Basil (Ocimum gratissimum) seeds, Organic

(5 customer reviews)

$3.95

Family: Mint (Lamiaceae)

Hardy to Zones 10 to 12, otherwise grown as a potted plant and brought in for the winter

(Vana Tulsi, Clove Basil, African Basil, Vantulasi, Wild Holy Basil, Tree Basil) Perennial bush basil to 5 feet, native to India and East Africa, a wild species brought into cultivation.  These seeds grown at our farm, secluded from other basils.  The plants are woody-stemmed and actually overwinter indoors more readily than the other tulsi types.  I have brought them successfully through a winter, planted in gallon pots on an indoor windowsill.  Source of eugenol (oil of clove).  The plant is handsome and aromatic, slightly hairy, green-leaved.  As a garden grown tea herb, it weighs up heavily and may be used by itself or blended with leaves of other types of tulsi. Traditional usage (Ayurveda): stress, anxiety, heart disease, arthritis, diabetes, and dementia.  Drinking tulsi tea in the morning is a fantastic way to get started.  Tulsi seed is a light-depndent germinator, and you can increase germ rates by holding the seed in the palm of your hand in the direct sunlight before planting.  Prepare a flat of potting soil or a fine seedbed in spring and scatter seeds on surface, then press in and keep evenly moist and warm until germination, which is rapid.  Transplant or thin to 2 to 3 feet apart.

Packet contains 50 seeds
1 g contains ~1,000 seeds
5 g contains ~5,000 seeds
10 g contains ~10,000 seeds

Certified Organically Grown

 

 

Clear

Share your thoughts!

5 out of 5 stars

5 reviews

Let us know what you think...

What others are saying

  1. mary

    Serious Tulsi!

    mary

    Germinated well indoors in April and transplanted equally well outdoors in June, avoiding a late Zone 3 frost. This is definitely the most robust of the tulsis I’ve grown thus far (temperate and Amrita being the other two). I find its aroma as a fresh leaf the least pleasant (a cross between clove and dirty socks) of the three, but its flavor when brewed as tea is absolutely delicious! Production was good when harvested mid-season and just before frost in September, when it was also dug and potted up – some plants brought indoors and some in a winter greenhouse for year-round harvest(?). Will follow-up on how these survive the low light conditions and cooler temps during a northern MN winter. Easy to grow, good production and tasty tea…this tulsi is keeper!

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi, thanks for the positive words. I believe you’ll find Vana to be the easiest of all the holy basils to overwinter. Richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

  2. One person found this helpful
    Melody

    I adore this plant!

    Melody

    On our farmlet we call this Tulsi the Gratitude Tulsi (sister to Holy Tulsi). I’m in zone 5 (north facing slope) and if I start seeds in greenhouse late April/early May, by the time I harvest early Sept before first frost I can stare it straight in the eye (ie about 5 1/2′ tall!). Such a giving plant- tea gets drunk all winter long. Has a distinctive cinnamon-like smell that I enjoy. The photo is of a praying mantis on a Vana plant a few years ago.

    Photo has been removed

    (1) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Melody,
      So good to hear about people’s experiences with plants–it gives so much perspective to hear how the plant performs in various ecological conditions. Vana tulsi is really highly adaptable–a perennial hedge in its native India or E Africa (where I originally sourced the seed), a productive annual in temperate gardens, a tough houseplant on the winter windowsill. Hard to imagine its all the same plant!
      Richo

      (1) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

  3. Question

    Nina

    What country or state are you sending it from?

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      We’re in Williams, Oregon, USA

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

  4. Meghan

    Holy Basil

    Meghan

    Love this Holy Basil variety! I live in SW Florida zone 9b/10a border and it has grown to almost 5.5′ tall and bushy. I have gotten so many leaves for tea from the one plant. It was easy to start seed in mid-late January then planted in a big pot. I keep pruning it to shape and the bees love the flowers! Can’t wait to have a few of these around!

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Meghan, thanks for getting it, these wild tulasi are wayside shrubs throughout much of my east african stomping ground and I’m absolutely impressed that you made it work in FL. Good going! Richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Brian

      I too love this– thank you so much for sharing it with the rest of the world. In Alabama I’ve noticed many native bees are attracted to Vana’s blooms, even more than the honeybees. Again, thanks <3

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

×

Login

Register

A password will be sent to your email address.

Continue as a Guest

Don't have an account? Sign Up