Poppy, Peshawar (Papaver somniferum var. album) seeds, organic

$3.95$34.10

Family:  Poppy (Papaveraceae)

Generally fall-sown in Zones 6 to 9 and spring-sown in colder zones

Cultivar from Persia flowers early and makes large pods.  Traditional usage (TWM): analgesic.  Spread seed on fast-draining soil in fall or very early spring.  For best results, plan the planting of poppies so that they germinate and grow during cool, moist weather and flower and make seed during hot, dry weather.  It takes some years of experimentation to figure out how to do this in the various temperate zones.  Those in southern Oregon strew the seed with the first fall rains and finish seed harvest in June.  Plant prefers full sun and highly nitrogenous, fast-draining soil of neutral pH.

Packet contains 300 seeds
1 g contains ~2,000 seeds
5 g contains ~10,000 seeds
10 g contains ~ 20,000 seeds

Certified Organically Grown

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  1. Ryan

    Question

    Ryan

    How do you know when the seed is mature and ready to harvest?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Ryan, Thanks for getting in touch. One knows by long association with the plant–the capitula dries and the seed inside rattles–then it is ready to harvest. Read “the medicinal herb grower” for more information on all of this. Richo

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  2. Allegra

    Allegra

    This is positively the most robust, towering, aggressive poppy I’ve ever grown. I grow Somniferum poppies every year and I grew these Peshawars for the first time this year. I foolishly planted them with Zahirs thinking the combination of white and purple would be beautiful. All that happened was that the Peshawar poppies raced heavenwards while the Zahir poppies (being more sedate and restrained) stopped growing at about 10 inches and just sulked. The Peshawar poppies bloomed profusely (and these flowers redefine the color white) and after the plants were finished flowering I cut them out. At that point the Zahir poppies took over and are now growing and blooming normally. Give the Peshawar poppies a fair amount of space to themselves and they won’t disappoint — they were lush, 4 feet tall, with multiple blooms per plant — very dramatic in the spring garden. The tissue-delicate flowers belie the hardiness of poppies in general. A splendid addition to my spring garden and one I’ll be planting again.

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