Plantain, Giant Turkish (Plantago major), packet of 100 seeds, organic

(4 customer reviews)

$3.95

Family:  Plantain (Plantaginaceae)

Hardy to Zones 3 to 10

Herbaceous perennial native to Turkey, probably the largest true Plantago to be found worldwide.  You’ll have plantain to your waist, and leaves up to 6 inches wide. Plant prefers moist to mesic soils and sun to part shade.  Sow seed in spring. Cool soil germinator. Barely cover seed with soil, tamp securely and keep evenly moist until germination, which is rapid.  Excessive heat during the germination phase may delay or disallow germination.  Thin or transplant to 1 foot apart.

100 seeds/pkt., Certified Organically Grown

In stock

Share your thoughts!

5 out of 5 stars

4 reviews

Let us know what you think...

What others are saying

  1. Question

    Francis-Olive Hampton

    Hi Richo. Question about germination. We are in full on summer here in CA, so, would stratifying work before direct garden sowing (worried that if I then sow in hot temps, it would not fare well)? Or could I sow in a small pot and keep in the fridge till it germinates?

    Finally, I have a pretty nice area that I want to plant in, a ‘woodland’ type of area (under a Chinese elm, so even when 90 degrees plus here, its significantly cooler under that huge tree), the problem is the sprawling roots. Can you still plant in the woodland area (I realize this is a silly question as I’m typing this, thinking of all of the little plants growing beneath forest trees!) Will the seedlings root just work/grow around the existing tree roots? If so, what about something like comfrey or burdock, or even thistle with long roots? Any gardening advice appreciated.

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Francis-Olive, Thanks for the nice note. It sounds like a nice place, there under the chinese elm. Comfrey is often grown below trees as it tends to assist them in many ways, and the roots of trees are not a problem for comfrey. Plantain, too, will grow in the shade of trees. It might be difficult to get the seeds to germinate at this time of year. Maybe you can start working up a bed and sow the seeds when the soil begins to cool down in the autumn. The plants grow rapidly, and the giant turkish is a good choice.
      Richo

      (1) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

  2. Question

    Dominique Demers

    Hi, We bought this variety of plantain this spring, in fact they grow huge and abbundant, but I found that a majority of them grow purple leaves. Is it a Turkish caracteristic?

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Dominique, Yes, it is a Turkish characteristic, due to the presence of anthocyanins which assist in the antiinflammatory effects of the herb. If you are after Plantago major (common broadleaf plantain) that is plain green, we have that listed as Plantain, Broadleaf. Richo

      (1) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Michael

      Hello Dominique and Richo Cech: I have Plantago major that has remained completely stable in reproducing the purplish cast to the leaves. The leaves get to about 6 inches in diameter but the plant remains relatively flat. The height is not any more than a typical Plantago.

      The first time that I encountered this purple-leaved Turkish variety was around 1990 at Gary Hammer’s “Desert To Jungle Nursery” in Montebello, California (which no longer exists). It was actually growing throughout and along the path between rows of nursery plants. Gary was a collector of plants from many desert and tropical areas but especially South Africa. He introduced the first variegated Cannas that came from South Africa. Now they have been developed into the likes of “Tropicana” etc.
      Also this was my first contact with Coleus shirensis (Plectranthus shirensis) from South Africa. This extremely fragrant and most forgiving plant would be the choice for planting if no other plant would grow with a guaranteed appeal to hummingbirds and incredible structural potential.

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Mayche Cech

      Mayche Cech

      Hello Michael, Plectranthus (coleus) is indeed easy, spectacular and fragrant. If you do much botanizing in Africa and India, you see it employed, in its various forms, almost everywhere, as it is an easy hedging plant that propagates readily from stem cuttings. The purple gene in the Plantago is dominant and if you grow atropurpurea next to any of your other broadleaf plantains, they will pick it up and start to demonstrate purple color. Richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

  3. Question

    Tracy

    Hello again! I just asked a previous question about Comfrey and Sheep Sorrel. Now, I’m asking the same question regarding the Plantain. When should I plant the seeds outdoors? I live in Prescott, AZ. The last frost date is predicted to be April 30th but that may not be current info. We still get 20’s in the evening and 60’s during the day. Any suggestions? Thank you!

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Plantains are among the easiest to germinate, but they do require a coolish soil, so sow them now, not later during the summer, high soil temperatures retard germination. richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

  4. Plantain Fan

    Plantain Fan

    This plantain is giant! It’s 2-3 times larger than any wild plantain I’ve ever seen.

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • SUSAN L SEARLES

      Are the leaves very tough? I want it to feed to pet rabbits.

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      I used to keep rabbits, too. I think plantain is a good choice for them. They can easily eat it, I think. They love green stuff. They are smart that way. r

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • thegiftofyou

      Two questions: Is this also good for human consumption? Are the medicinal properties equal to the regular broad leaf variety? Thank you, in advance!

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      The Giant Turkish Plantain is a cultivar of broadleaf plantain (Plantago major) and is safe for human consumption and medicinally interchangeable with standard broadleaf plantain. The Giant Turkish is a preferred type.

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

×

Login

Register

A password will be sent to your email address.

Continue as a Guest

Don't have an account? Sign Up