Plants ordered now will ship Spring 2020.

Passionflower, Official (Passiflora incarnata) potted plant, organic

$7.50$50.00

Hardy to Zones 7 to 12

(Maypop, Passion Flower, Passion Vine)  Herbaceous or woody vine, native to the southeastern and eastern US. The flowers are wonderfully large, three dimensional, complex, purple and white. The plant prefers full sun, dryish soils and a trellis. The first year or two, while the plant is getting established, you need to keep them watered and weeded. After that, you just provide a place for them to climb. Useful in making seasonal, living shade structures and for landscape/fence adornment. Traditional usage: TWM, hypnotic.  Space plants 2 to 3 feet apart.

Potted plant, Certified Organically Grown

 

Clear

Share your thoughts!

Let us know what you think...

What others are saying

  1. Question

    Raven

    Does this passion flower make edible passion fruit? What do the fruits taste like?

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Diana

      Admin Diana

      Hi Raven,
      These are not really the prime edible passion fruit. They do make edible fruits about the size of a large egg, and the fruits are tart. They get sweeter when very mature. They have plenty of juice in them, too.

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Farrar Cusomato

      I have harvested this native of TN on our last farm-like property where it grew wild all over, but am now trying to get it established at our new home (more in the burbs). I seasonally made a jam from the fruit- it has an amazingly unique taste. The fruits are nice to nibble on, but have large seeds that you’d always be spitting out. As your making the jam, you put the pulp through a seed plate for seedless jam. You can probably hunt down a jam recipe online. I’m learning more about the herbal properties of the leaves, and am hoping to make more use of the plant in the future. Such an amazing plant….

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Claire

      Hi! I live in south eastern PA.
      Do you have to bring these beauties inside for the winter?
      Thanks

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hi Claire,
      No, they make very deep, ropy roots that overwinter easily. Passionflower doesn’t make a very good potted plant, it likes to grow in a sunny, dryish exposure and delves deep.
      Richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Ann Wooledge

      You indicate hardy zones 7 to 12 but you also say it overwinters easily in eastern PA. I’m curious because I love this plant and really would like to get it established on a trellis my husband made for me that runs along our deck, but we are in Nebraska, which is hardy zone 5. I was thinking I could bring it in each winter, but not if it needs room for deep roots. I am also in a herbal class and assuming this is the passion flower variety with the sedating properties?

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Anne,
      This is the passionflower that is used for sedation. The roots run VERY DEEP. It likes a fast-draining soil and full sun position, and does great with a trellis. It will probably perennialize if the above conditions are maintained, even in a Z5. It is native to KY, where the winters are severe. I am going to enable the plants again, we have some nice ones in stock.
      Richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

  2. Cindy Donahey

    Cindy Donahey

    The flowers make a nice purple vinegar, which I think mellows to some kind of amber. I froze some, as I wanted to keep the color. Nice to make a temporary purple sugar or salt. You can use the green skins for a marmalade.

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

×

Login

Register

A password will be sent to your email address.

Continue as a Guest

Don't have an account? Sign Up