Passionflower, Official (Passiflora incarnata) potted plant, organic

$8.50$65.00

Hardy to Zones 7 to 12

(Maypop, Passion Flower, Passion Vine)  Herbaceous or woody vine, native to the southeastern and eastern US. The flowers are wonderfully large, three dimensional, complex, purple and white. The plant prefers full sun, dryish soils and a trellis. The first year or two, while the plant is getting established, you need to keep them watered and weeded. After that, you just provide a place for them to climb. Useful in making seasonal, living shade structures and for landscape/fence adornment. Traditional usage: TWM, hypnotic.  Space plants 2 to 3 feet apart.

Potted plant, Certified Organically Grown

 

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  1. Question

    Crissy

    Would planting this late summer to give it a head start next year be ok or is spring planting better?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Crissy,
      It kinda depends on your zone, but for sure in zones 6 and up I would plant in the late summer to fall for a stronger show come next year.
      Richo

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  2. Question

    Jessica

    What size are these plants when they arrive?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      3 inch pots and 3 inches of growth

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  3. Question

    Kristen A.

    I live in East Texas in zone 7b/8. I’ve read conflicting information about the invasiveness of this plant. Some say they see shoots pop up 40 ft away. Is this a plant that will become a nuisance in my area? I don’t want it to try to take over my vegetable garden. Any advice?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Kristen,
      You’re talking to Richo who enjoys enthusiastic plants and doesn’t use the “I” word. Passionflower seems to limit itself to the compacted, dry and rocky aspect–it doesn’t much like to grow in the rich soil of a vegetable garden. hope that helps. richo

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  4. Question

    Raven

    Does this passion flower make edible passion fruit? What do the fruits taste like?

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    • Diana

      Admin Diana

      Hi Raven,
      These are not really the prime edible passion fruit. They do make edible fruits about the size of a large egg, and the fruits are tart. They get sweeter when very mature. They have plenty of juice in them, too.

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    • Farrar Cusomato

      I have harvested this native of TN on our last farm-like property where it grew wild all over, but am now trying to get it established at our new home (more in the burbs). I seasonally made a jam from the fruit- it has an amazingly unique taste. The fruits are nice to nibble on, but have large seeds that you’d always be spitting out. As your making the jam, you put the pulp through a seed plate for seedless jam. You can probably hunt down a jam recipe online. I’m learning more about the herbal properties of the leaves, and am hoping to make more use of the plant in the future. Such an amazing plant….

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    • Claire

      Hi! I live in south eastern PA.
      Do you have to bring these beauties inside for the winter?
      Thanks

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hi Claire,
      No, they make very deep, ropy roots that overwinter easily. Passionflower doesn’t make a very good potted plant, it likes to grow in a sunny, dryish exposure and delves deep.
      Richo

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    • Ann Wooledge

      You indicate hardy zones 7 to 12 but you also say it overwinters easily in eastern PA. I’m curious because I love this plant and really would like to get it established on a trellis my husband made for me that runs along our deck, but we are in Nebraska, which is hardy zone 5. I was thinking I could bring it in each winter, but not if it needs room for deep roots. I am also in a herbal class and assuming this is the passion flower variety with the sedating properties?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Anne,
      This is the passionflower that is used for sedation. The roots run VERY DEEP. It likes a fast-draining soil and full sun position, and does great with a trellis. It will probably perennialize if the above conditions are maintained, even in a Z5. It is native to KY, where the winters are severe. I am going to enable the plants again, we have some nice ones in stock.
      Richo

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    • Marcia

      Is it okay to grow it near underground pipes, or do the roots interfere with pipes like wisteria do? Also, does it thrive in the NW? I live on the Puget Sound in WA — “marine climate” (zone 8).

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Marcia,
      I haven’t had this problem with passionflower. The roots do run great distances but they remain rope-like, not something that clogs a pipe, and they don’t seek wetness, more they seek dryness, especially in maritime washington. yes, passionflower is hardy to your area and is a great choice in my opinion.
      Richo

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    • Ariel Rose (verified owner)

      How does it do in the DG/clay soils of southern oregon…..dry in summer but could be overly moist in winter?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Ariel,
      It is impossible to keep passionflower back in Southern Oregon, decomposed granite or no.
      Richo

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  5. Cindy Donahey

    Cindy Donahey

    The flowers make a nice purple vinegar, which I think mellows to some kind of amber. I froze some, as I wanted to keep the color. Nice to make a temporary purple sugar or salt. You can use the green skins for a marmalade.

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    • Lydia (verified owner)

      Hello, I just received two beautiful plants from you. For making medicine, I heard that the buds and shoots of the plant are to be harvested. Do you do this every week or two after the plant gets well established? Or do you wait til late in the season to do a big cut-back (harvest)?
      If the continual harvest, I suppose I would dry what I harvest and then make a tincture at the end of the season? Or is fresh plant tincture a better method? Thanks!

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Lydia,
      You can check the specifics in “Making Plant Medicine,” but the fresh plant tincture is superior I think. Use the aerial parts, the non-woody vine, leaves, buds and flowers. These can be very productive in the warm months and several harvests are possible. Just trim and tincture. r

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    • Lydia (verified owner)

      Do you know if other passionflowers besides incarnata are medicinal (sedative)?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Lydia, I believe you can use edulis aerial parts but frankly I prefer incarnata. Its a poorly studied medicinal plant that is quirky, which leads me to want to use the official variety instead of other spp. richo

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