Plants ordered now will ship OCTOBER 2021.
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Mormon Tea, Green (Ephedra viridis) potted plant, organic

$10.00

Family:  Joint Fir (Ephedraceae)

Hardy to zone 6 to 12

Perennial, primitive shrub with jointed stems.  Native to the American Southwest. Plant prefers full sun and alkaline, dry to mesic soils.  Probably best to pot up to bigger pots and grow out for a year or two before transplanting to landscape.   Traditional usage: Mormon.  Used as a non-stimulating bronchial dilator for palliative treatment of the common cold or asthma.

Potted Plant, Certified Organically Grown

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  1. Question

    Jen

    Hello, I am just confirming you would recommend we continue to grow these indoors for at least a year before planting? I am new to indoor seed starting/plant nurturing, so I assume a grow light would be recommended. Anything else that you suggest? Thank you.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Jen,
      Ephedra are slow-growing and tough. I would keep mine in a greenhouse, even if unheated, and that would give sufficient natural light and day/night oscillations. Plants tend to suffer under lights–lights are best used simply to get a jump on the season and offer more control with seed-starting. If you must use lights to grow plants on, make sure to provide excellent air movement and set the lights on a timer so that the daylength is not erratic, either that or be very good about turning them on at dawn and off at dusk. richo

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    • Jen

      Thanks for taking the time to clarify. So you think if I got a small greenhouse and kept it outside (even in our cold Colorado) winter that would be better? I can make sure it’s in the sunniest spot available. I will take a look at options for a set up. I honestly love the look of these plants and how they can bring a spot of green to my winter landscape (once they are ready!).

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      yes, it is often effective to overwinter small potted plants in an unheated greenhouse and plant them to landscape after they size up sufficiently.

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  2. Question

    Harry (verified owner)

    Are the Ephedra viridis plants you offer derived from seeds or cuttings? Just curious.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Harry, This is a good question with Ephedra–plants from cuttings are usually pretty weak. They are grown from seed and they are nice. I planted one to the field about 3 days ago, to make up for a gap in the bed, and it made me realize just how solid these are for folks who get them. At the current moment (4/23/2020), these are the best plant in Ephedra that we’re offering.
      Richo

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    • kcm2880

      How does this Ephedra viridis compare with Ephedra nevadensis? Also, can either be successfully grown in a pot (how large)? There is no ground to plant it in, just an open-air condo balcony.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi! The viridis has a greener stem and is a little less cold-hardy than E. nevadensis. They both can be grown in pots, and the larger the pot, the larger the plant. Start in quarts, move up to gallons and finish in 3-gallons. Always use cactus mix and top-dress with 2 inches of white pumice. Water sparingly through that. r

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  3. Question

    Andrew C Sandler

    When will this be available? Mormon Tea Green (Ephedra viridis) potted plant, organic
    $10.00 – $24.30

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hi Andrew,
      OK, I enabled the green mormon tea plants, you can order if you want. These are still a bit undersize end of March 2019 but are growing fast. Mormon tea tends to be pretty tough and I think these will make good plants for people.
      Richo

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    • Laura Dain

      If I order now, when will the plants arrive? ?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Laura,
      New orders are being set up to ship late April. All our shipping dates up until then are overfull.
      Richo

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    • Alyssa M.

      Can you specify which USDA zones this plant will or will not grow in and if potted, what zones and conditions they’ll thrive best in? I’m currently residing in USDA zone 8b – 9 and would love to be able to successfully grow this here. Thanks! 🙂

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Alyssa,
      Oh, if you click on the photo then it brings up the monograph! Here’s the info: Hardy to zone 6 to 12

      Perennial, primitive shrub with jointed stems. Native to the American Southwest. Plant prefers full sun and alkaline, dry to mesic soils. Probably best to pot up to bigger pots and grow out for a year or two before transplanting to landscape. May be kept potted if preferred. Traditional usage: Mormon. Used as a non-stimulating bronchial dilator for palliative treatment of the common cold or asthma.

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      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

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