Moringa (Moringa oleifera) seeds

$4.95

Family: Moringa (Moringaceae)

Hardy to Zones 9 to 12, otherwise grown as a potted plant and brought in for the winter

(Drumstick Tree) Fast-growing decidous tree native to northwestern India and cultivated throughout the tropics and subtropics.  Moringa will grow outdoors in the US Zone 9 and warmer.  Otherwise, protect from frost.    Known as the “Drumstick Tree” in India, the immature seedpods are eaten as a standard foodstuff, tasting rather like asparagus and quite easily digested as well as being very tasty.  Beyond asparagus, virtually every part of the tree is useful in food and medicine.  The roots are ground up and used as a condiment.  Traditional usage (Siddha): sexual dysfunction, antiinflammatory, analgesic.  The crushed seeds can be used as a phytoremediating filter for purifying water.  The branches are used as fodder.  The leaves are full of vitamin C, A, calcium, iron, potassium and protein.  They are a good anti-famine food.  Tree prefers full sun and dry to mesic soils. The tree grows very well in containerized culture, but requires sufficient root space, so large containers work best.  Fill the container with equal parts organic compost, sand and pumice.  The tree enjoys regular watering but must never be allowed to sit in water.  Always give fast-draining soil, whether planting outdoors or in pots.  Seeds are quite large. Sow the seeds in a pot of sandy potting soil, about 1/2 inch deep, and keep barely moist, very warm and in the light.  Germination occurs in 1 to 2 weeks.  Work seedlings up in pots before transplanting to large containers or the landscape.

10 seeds /pkt.
10 g contains ~ 40 seeds

Open Pollinated, Untreated, NO GMO’s

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  1. Kelly Schoen

    Planted 5 seeds have 5 sprouts

    Kelly Schoen (verified owner)

    Sprouted quickly, great stock! Thanks guys : )

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  2. One person found this helpful

    Question

    Joyce

    Does anyone know how many years the seeds will stay viable in cool, dark conditions?

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Joyce, These fall under the class of fatty tropical tree seeds and as such they are short-lived. A year or two is all you can expect.
      Richo

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  3. Question

    Beth Zimmerman

    Is this tree deer resistant or would I need to grow it in a fenced in area?

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    • Diana

      Diana

      Hi Beth,
      The leaves of Moringa are very attractive to deer, the tree would need protection.
      richo

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    • One person found this helpful

      Kathy Young

      I keep deer out of my garden area by erecting some fence posts and stringing 4-5 strands of 30-POUND CLEAR FISHING LINE. They touch it but can’t see it and are spooked. They break 20-lb line and can see 40-lb line. They don’t know how high to jump over it if they can’t see it. I’ve been protecting my sweet potato vines (!) and other delectables from them for several years now like this..You may have to fence off your tree like I do my garden.

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  4. 3 out of 3 people found this helpful
    Al Clark

    I have 5 growing in zone 5

    Al Clark

    I bought these thinking they would be a great treat for my Chickens, and Turkeys. They love them (along with Comphrey). I currently have them indoors, and they are doing fine. I throw the leaves in salads, stir fry, and in sandwiches. I plan on keeping this plant small. Love it!

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    • beth.wallace.tn

      Have you had success keeping the plant small? Are you topping it?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      We haven’t tried to keep these small. they are naturally a fairly small tree.

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    • JD (verified owner)

      Is that photo of whole tree really the moringa plant, –it looks so different from the picture of the moringa seedling…? ( I am looking at the picture of the flower, too, trying to compare to the whole tree photo…)

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      all the photos in the moringa gallery are pictures of moringa trees in various stages of growth

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    • Rachel

      Hi Richo,

      Do you have suggested resources for learning about the nutritional information of moringa indepth ? I’m becoming interested in growing a lot of these and possibly producing my own powdered moringa

      Thank you so much
      Rachel

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Yes, and BTW the moringa seed we have in right now is really good. Here’s the link https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213453016300362#:~:text=The%20leaves%20of%20M.,oleifera%20%5B8%5D.
      Richo

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    • Ash

      I planted some outside in Zone 5 for the season. Despite a full cylindrical chicken wire cage, their tops were eaten off by chipmunks or squirrels. Only they could have climbed down the top of the cylinder to get at the seedlings. Bizarre that flora and fauna of different climates and continents interacted so.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Ash, I hear ya. In a way, its like nature saying “this doesn’t really belong here and I’ll figure out all kinds of ways to let you know.” On our side, we eventually learned not to try to ship the small seedlings to people–they quickly expire under such treatment. I’m still working on some way to incorporate Moringa in a colder than tropical zone–probably in the greenhouse only. They are so rambunctious as seedlings–I planted a flat under lights with three per cell and now for all practical purposes I have three flats worth. I’m going to work them up in pots and see if they are more permanent (and squirrel-proof?) once they harden off. Keep trying. Richo

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    • Denise

      I am borderline between zone 8 and 9. Anyone know what is the lowest winter temp Moringa can stand?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hi denise, 32 degrees F. Richo

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