We are taking a break from the heat.  We will resume shipping plants starting in September.  Feel free to pre-order plants for your fall garden.  First come, first served.

Meadowsweet (Spirea ulmaria) potted plant, organic

(6 customer reviews)

$7.50$50.00

Family:  Rose (Rosaceae)

Hardy to Zones 3 to 9

(Filipendula ulmaria) Herbaceous perennial to about 4 feet.  Native to temperate Europe and Asia.  Multiple stems arise from a spreading crown with delicate, ferny leaves.  Masses of creamy flowers are fragrant,  like honey and mead.  We specialize in this plant, which gives copious quantities of flowers.  Traditional usage TWM):  anti-inflammatory and pain relieving.  Source of salicylic acid.  The word “aspirin” was invented as a conjuncton of the Latin “a spirea” meaning “of Spirea.”  Plant prefers rich, moisture retentive loam, plenty of water, and a part shade to full sun exposure.  Space plants 2 feet apart.

Potted plant, Certified Organically Grown

 

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5 out of 5 stars

6 reviews

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What others are saying

  1. One person found this helpful
    katie

    Preforms well

    katie

    My meadowsweet is the darling of my “side garden” on the western face of my house. Her lovely textured leaves tolerate the sun and dryness better than I had anticipated and she has grown back now for her 3rd year with no special treatment. While not as big and booming as she would be in a bit more shade and moisture this is a hardy plant that has not failed to make me smile since digging it in.

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  2. Question

    Jane H

    I’m confused why are there 2 botanical names in the description ? Spirea ulmaria and Filipendula ulmaria ?

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      simply covering the taxonomical bases–it was a shame when the taxonomists moved spirea to filipendula because spirea helped people remember the antiinflammatory and analgesic nature of the plant– “a-spirea,” as in “of spirea” was shortened by pharmacists to name the purified form “aspirin.” I retain tons of old taxonomy in my descriptions, and often the taxonomists come full circle and re-adopt the old nomenclature. Its a bit stupid, really. the plant is the plant.

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  3. Question

    Elizabeth

    I installed filipendula ulmaria at a client’s and we love it. I purchased some for my property from the same nursery, now closed. The leaves on those are enormous. Mine have been hit by deer so many times it’s afraid to undertake lift off again or so it seems. I’m wondering why your mature plants have leaves that are so much smaller.

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Leaf size on any plant will be larger when grown in the shade vs the sun, due to the fact that leaves are smart–they increase photosynthetic surface area when there is less light. We carry the true medicinal meadowsweet–I believe there may be cultivars out there that have larger leaves.

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  4. Question

    Linda

    Is it aggressive, invasive in zone five-six?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      no

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  5. One person found this helpful

    Question

    Wynne

    I live on an island in north florida (zone 9) where the soil is generally poor & sandy. Two questions:
    1. Will this do well in pots?
    2. How big are the plants you sell?
    Thanks!

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Wynn,
      Meadowsweet is good in pots when young, but flowers out to 4 feet or so, making the mature plant a bit topheavy for pots. Regarding the sizing of plants, at this time of year almost everything we have is rather large to the pot. The meadowsweet would be either the older plants (6 inches) or the newer planting (3 inches). You can request the biggest plant possible if that is what you’re after.
      Richo

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  6. Question

    melinda.fox13

    When it says, part shade to full sun,, does that mean it prefers shade to sun, or does it mean it will grow in any light?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      It means it prefers part shade but will do ok in the sun if kept sufficiently moist

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  7. Kelsie Sadler

    Kelsie Sadler

    Love this plant. I ordered from Strictly Medicinal last year and all my plants are thriving a year later. Thank you so much!!

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