Meadowsweet (Spiraea ulmaria) seeds, organic

$3.95

Family:  Rose (Rosaceae)

Hardy to Zones 3 to 9

(Filipendula ulmaria) Herbaceous perennial to about 4 feet.  Native to temperate Europe and Asia.  Multiple stems arise from a spreading crown with delicate, ferny leaves.  Masses of creamy flowers are fragrant,  like honey and mead.  We specialize in this plant, which gives copious quantities of flowers.  Traditional usage TWM):  anti-inflammatory and pain relieving.  Source of salicylic acid.  The word “aspirin” was invented as a conjuncton of the Latin “a spirea” meaning “of Spirea.”  Plant prefers rich, moisture retentive loam, plenty of water, and a part shade to full sun exposure.  The seeds are slow to germinate and should be kept barely covered, cool, evenly moist, and in part shade.  Pot up seedlings and work up to size before transplanting out.  This usually takes 6 weeks in the spring greenhouse or in the summer shadehouse. Space plants 2 feet apart.

Packet contains 100 seeds
1 g contains ~1,800 seeds
Certified Organically Grown

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  1. Question

    A Allsman

    Beekeeper here, is this the seed that grows the plant that supplies the nectar/pollen for Meadowsweet honey?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Yes, I think so, in much the same way that blackberry honey comes from blackberry blossoms, clover honey from clover blossoms, etc. Meadowsweet does have profuse nectaries. r

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  2. Question

    Cathy Earley

    Meadowsweet (Spiraea ulmaria) seeds, organic noted at header.
    (Filipendula ulmaria) Herbaceous perennial noted in description.
    Which is it? And how do I trust that you will send what I am intending to buy.

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Its an organically grown herbaceous perennial.

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    • Woodvamp

      I’ve read that meadowsweet like stratification and osilating temperatures has that been your experience?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      meadowsweet likes a cool environment and is slow to germ–3 weeks germ time is typical. yes, the oscillations provided by an unheated greenhouse in the early spring are pretty ideal.

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    • CJ

      Hello, I read that meadowsweet is native to the Allegheny Mountains, but here it says Europe and Asia

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      From PFAF database: Meadowsweet (Spirea/filipendula) ulmaria native range:
      Europe, including Britain, from Iceland south and east to Spain, temperate Asia and Mongolia.

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    • Paia Doctolero

      Hello! If I sow meadowsweet in Jan, Zone 8a, in the PNW, will it flower this same year? And how is the germination rate?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Paia,
      The germination on the meadowsweet seed is very good, especially if the planter knows how to work with slow-germinating seeds. THese generally flower in the second year.
      Richo

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    • Bobbi

      Would you recommend root divisions if aiming for first year flowering?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      b, Root divisions on this are tricky as it tends to have a fairly compact rhizome, it is easy to snip an established plant into root cuttings and end up with less than you started with. Root divisions must be made in the fall or very early spring in order to be successful. If they take, they wouldn’t tend to flower in the first year. We have a lot of good ones of these in stock in the plants section. r

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    • Sweet

      How might meadowsweet grow in 9B – in a warmer section of central FL?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      It grows fine in the warm shade.

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    • Donna

      Hello Richo,

      I have a couple of questions. First, how many plants would I want to keep in my garden that would allow me to harvest flowers for my own use, and let some set seed for collection. Second, what size pots would you recommend for overwintering in an unheated greenhouse. Third, if I seed in the next couple of weeks (It’s July 6th) would they flower next year? And lastly, would I still have time this year to plant out this fall the ones I plan to keep for my own garden? (I’m in western Washington)

      Thank you. I appreciate the knowledge you share with us.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Donna,
      Thanks for contacting. It is my pleasure to do my best to share what I know about the various plants. Meadowsweet does make a fairly large plant, so I think a triangle (3 plants) planted to the shade garden would be enough for home use, medicine making and seed saving. In California and the Pacific NW we have the unique opportunity to start herbaceous perennials throughout the year. These may be planted to the garden as small seedlings in the fall, which encourages bountiful flowering the following year, or the plants may be worked up in gallon-size or greater pots in the greenhouse, which also affords sufficient winter protection to make sure they don’t expire during dormancy.
      Richo

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