Lomatium dissectum seeds

(3 customer reviews)

$4.95

Family: Carrot (Apiaceae)

Hardy to Zones 6 to 10

(Leptotaenia multifida/dissecta, Chocolate tips) Wild, celery-like herbaceous perennial  native to the Great Basin and other drylands of the West. Traditional usage (American Indian, TWM): antiviral for colds, flus, epidemics. In nature, Lomatium grows on sunny slopes in dryish, rocky soil, anchored by a giant tap root that is filled with aromatic oleo-gum-resin.  Sow seed in outdoor nursery bed in the fall to early spring, with germination in the spring. Alternatively, give 60 days cold, moist treatment (put seed in moist peat moss in a plastic bag in fridge) and then sow seed in warm soil.  Plant 1 to 2 feet apart.  Flowers in large umbels, to 3 feet tall.

30 seeds/pkt, Open Pollinated, Untreated, NO GMO’s

5 g contains ~300 seeds
10 g contains ~600 seeds

 

 

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5 out of 5 stars

3 reviews

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  1. One person found this helpful
    Rick Schneck

    Grown in northern Michigan

    Rick Schneck

    Planted in 2001. Harvested 2 weeks ago. Thank you Richo for making this available.

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      The years roll on and on, and even tiny fishes grow in time to great salmon. If wishes were fishes we’d all throw nets–or plant seeds, as it were.

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    • Heather

      Rick Schneck I am in the UP, edging on zone 5 but often really a zone 4. . What zone are you in and did you do anything special to get this to take!? Thank you!!!!

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Heather, We were always in Z 7 until global warming and now we’re in a Z 8. Lomatium dissectum is fall planted in deep, screened flats in the shade, in the fall, and it germinates midwinter to spring. You can read all about it in my book “Growing At-Risk,” that has a whole chapter on Lomatium dissectum.
      Richo

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    • Rick

      Heather
      Global warming has had the same effect here, especially the last 10 years. This was zone 4 when I planted it. -20ºF or colder used to be common most winters. Been several years since it’s been that cold. Except for one location that didn’t drain as well, the cold and deep snow never caused any problems. Pick a location where the snow melt can flow away from the bed. I fall planted the seed in a shallow trench, held in place with a thin layer of loose grass clippings. The seed germinated in the spring shortly after the snow melted. The grass clippings provided just enough shade to keep the seed moist while letting the light through. Beyond that, they’ve needed no special care.
      Rick

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  2. Question

    Chris Grayling

    Any possibility of selling a seedling or plant? (Shipping In a tube, perhaps?)

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Chris,
      We’re going to have thousands of these to sell as plants. Please stay tuned, they are so slow going, I’m not going to list them until 2021.
      Richo

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    • Vince

      Hi Richo,

      please put me up for a batch as well – shipping to Germany if possible. It`s pretty much impossible to get them here.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Vince,
      I would love to send you seeds but new EU standards on seed shipments make this impossible. If you know someone in England, you can have the seeds sent there, as they are no longer in the EU.
      Richo

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  3. Question

    Lesley Verbrugge

    Do you, would you, could you ship to Europe?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      hi lesley, yes, we ship lomatium seeds internationally. love your Seussian choice of words–would you, could you, in a box? would you, could you, with a fox? richo

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  4. One person found this helpful
    Ted B. - Alabama, USA

    Ted B. – Alabama, USA (verified owner)

    I never had success germinating this species with spring sowing, and just blamed it on the short springtimes typical of the SE USA. I then decided to give it one last try, which I did by hydrating seeds for 24hr in a 300 ppm solution of gibberellic acid, then keeping refrigerated in moist sand in a clear plastic container. That did the trick, with the first seed sprouting in ~45 days. Seeds produce a lengthy taproot quickly, so they must be checked often if using this method.

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    • 3 out of 3 people found this helpful

      Rick Schneck

      I planted Lomatium in 2001in several locations. My best results are in a raised bed on a gently southern slope in sandy soil. I planted the seed in the fall. Got reasonable germination in the spring. The mature plants will reseed themselves, but the taproot makes the seedlings almost unmovable. Plant in a permanent location.The plants have survived wet summers, deep snows, rainy winters, and -40º temperatures. With excellent drainage, the plants are extremely hardy.

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