Hayflower Medicinal Pasture Mix, Organic

$6.10$49.00

Zones 2 to 9

Hayflower is a generous mix of the following organically certified grasses, clovers and medicinal herb seeds:

Timothy Grass (Phleum pratense)
Oat (Avena sativa)
Crimson Clover (Trifolium incarnatum)
Red Clover (Trifolium pratense)
Greek Hay (Fenugreek)  (Trigonella feonum-graecum)
Chicory, Wild Form (Cichorium intybus)
Sweet Vernal Grass (Anthoxanthum odoratum)
Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus)
Chamomile, German (Matricaria recutita)
Yellow Dock (Rumex crispus)
Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)
Dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis)
Plantain (Plantago major)
Avens (Geum urbanum)
Poppy, Flanders (Papaver rhoeas)

Description:  At the bottom of the haystack, where the “fines” accumulate, is a substance made from the friable leaves and flowers that shatter from the hay itself.  Naturopathic doctors of the early 1900’s called this substance “hayflower.” and used it extensively, making teas, compresses, decoctions and poultices from it.  Coupled with hydrotherapy, the results achieved against the common ailments of the day–colds and flu, aches and pains, arthritis, fever, headache, digestive woes, skin complaints, injury, infections, etc. were legendary.  Modern-day hay doesn’t make very good hayflower, because it lacks the healthy diversity of medicinal herbs that used to grow in every hayfield.  Our Hayflower Medicinal Pasture Seed Mix is designed to bring back the original formula, making it possible for you to grow your own hayflower, perennially, in a colorfully florific and aromatic field that is good for browsers, pollinators, wildlife and . . . herb walks.

Cultivation:  Hayflower herbal pasture mix may be planted in the fall or spring.  Prepare a fine seed bed and strew the seed evenly on the surface, then rake and tamp.  Keep evenly moist until germination, or allow the fall or spring rains to work on the seeds until they germinate. This is a blend of perennials and self-seeding annuals that should be maintained by fertilizing, watering and mowing.  Different species will predominate seasonally.  Suitable for Zones 2 to 9.

Coverage:  The 10 g packet covers a bed 4 feet wide and 10 feet long.  The 100 g packet covers a bed 4 feet wide and 100 feet long.  The pound covers 2,000 square feet.  Sow 10 lbs per acre.

All seeds in Hayflower Mix are certified organically grown

Clear

Share your thoughts!

Let us know what you think...

What others are saying

  1. Question

    Liz Schlinsog

    Have you made a tea from the “fines”? Would this be something of import today or are there better teas now? Or is this now geared more towards animals?

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Liz,
      This is not geared toward animals and you can make tea from the fines, it is a nontoxic blend. Mainly hayflower was used externally in soaks, compresses, poultices. r

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

  2. Question

    Lyn

    Can I grow this indoors and is it good for my bunny? I thought poppy is dangerous to rabbits? She loves her plantain and dandelion but I’m wondering if this would be a healthy addition to her overall diet. Just need to know if it’s safe and if I can grow it indoors for the winter. In NW hills of CT, zone 5.

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Lyn,
      Probably best to go with Winter Rye in that situation–very winter productive, good for bunnies and significantly less costly than our diverse organic pasture mix. Here’s the link https://strictlymedicinalseeds.com/product/winter-rye-secale-cereal-seeds-organic/
      Richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

  3. Question

    Sue Singler

    Would this be ok for goats to browse?

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Diana

      Diana

      yes, it is fine for goats. However if you really want to bulk up your goats plant the FORAGE CHICORY.

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

  4. Question

    GERALDINE McNAMARA

    testing pasture in FL – double checking it’s good for cattle to munch on. thanks

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Diana

      Diana

      It should be fine, although that isn’t the reason we’re promoting this mix. If you want standard cattle pasture, use alfalfa and orchard grass. Milk cows do OK on alfalfa only. Richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

  5. Richo Cech

    Richo Cech

    I’ll e-mail you when theyu come into stock, midmonth april 2019.

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

  6. Question

    Lisa

    Can I plant this in my horse pasture?

    (0) (0)

    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      There is nothing there that will hurt horses, but you’ll have to keep the horses off the planting until it becomes established.

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Rebecca

      Is this safe for dogs and cats that spend time in the yard?

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Yes, it is designed as good pasturage for all animals. Richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Nadine

      Will this grow well in shade and semi-shade or does it need full sun?

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Nadine,
      Hayflower needs sun to part shade. It won’t grow well in the shade.
      Richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • frieda

      how about for sheep? I could keep them off the field until things germinate, but would need to rotate them in eventually. and there’s velvet grass, oh so much velvet grass to outsmart….

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Frieda,
      Hayflower is fine for sheep. They will appreciate especially the chicory. In fact, you might try planting a simple combination 50/50 of chicory and clover, which is a standard approach for lamb/sheep pasturage. Yes, rotation is key!
      Richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Marie Eliades

      I have a berm needing erosion control. I have larger plants/herbs that I’m hoping will take over but in the mean time there is lots of areas with only the sol. Would this be a good choice while my main plants are growing in size? Thank you. (2000 ft – California sequoia foothills – hot summers/cool winters 1 -2 light snows per year)

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Marie, I would council to use instead the clover/poppy mix that we carry, which will work better as an undersow to larger plants and herbs. Some of the species in hayflower may overpower your current plantings. richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Marie Eliades

      I have lots of gofers and deer and rabbits and so on.. if anything would take over anything it would be a real shocker.. I failed to mention my plants are all chosen to be “medicinal”/useful and invasive……mints, oregano’s, yarrow, rosemary, salvia’s etc.. trying to hold up the hill and benefit at the same time..crazy no? I love watching plants get sucked into the ground.. the “Important” ones are in cages but the critters can kill those too.. I’ve been planting 2 years on this plot and so far the deer just have a sample and wonder what kind of garbage is on our land..lol.. everything is smelly and unpopular….:)

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Su

      Would anything in this mix be harmful to meat rabbits or meat/egg chickens?

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      I don’t think so, rabbits and chickens did well with fodder such as this during the heyday of naturopathy.

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Cecilia Parker

      I have a patchy, low-growing front lawn (that is not watered or fertilized) that I plan to eventually re-plant in native and edible plants: could I sow the hayflower mix into the grass, or would the clover/poppy mix have a better chance of establishing itself (and crowding out the grass)? I’m in western WA, with beautifully rainy Spring weather.

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Cecilia,
      Grasses are converted to a seedbed either by way of rototilling or by deep mulching with straw. You can’t just spread seeds on a lawn and expect much to happen–the grass is dominant. Richo

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Carol

      Hi; I’d like to grow my own “hay” to use as mulch for my vegetable gardens, as well as to plant potatoes in. Would this mix be good for that, or do you have a better suggestion? Also to use in my compost pile, if I were to get enough growth. I am in the suburbs, and have a “hidden” backyard that I have turned into a hybrid garden of eden / food forest type garden. I am converting all plants on the property into either medicinal or food plants, while making it look like simple landscaping.

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      I think you could just use winter rye in the fall and oats in the spring. That would give you something more like hay, that would not tend to have seeds in it, unless you left it too long.

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Carol C

      Thanks; I did go look at the winter rye and it says it is hardy to Zone 5. I am in Missouri, Zone 6. Does that change your answer at all, for using it as a cover crop/hay/mulch source? Thanks very much.

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      No, if the rye is winter hardy down to zone 5 and you’re in a zone 6 then it is winter hardy to you. it would be a problem if you were in a zone 4…

      (0) (0)

      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

×

Login

Register

A password will be sent to your email address.

Continue as a Guest

Don't have an account? Sign Up