Plants ordered today will be shipped in the Spring 2023.

Ginger, Wild (Asarum caudatum) potted plant, organic

$11.00

Family:  Birthwort (Aristolochiaceae)

Hardy to Zones 4 to 8

(Western Wild Ginger) Evergreen perennial broadleaved groundcover native to the western US.  An ancient and comely plant, with leathery, shiny, heartshaped leaves, to 6 inches tall, flowering white.  Flowers in late winter are rarely seen, nestled below the leaves and often within the mulch, colored mauve with long tails, showy when seen.  Ant-pollinated, they drop their seeds and create new seedlings from time to time.  Traditional usage (American Indian, TWM): stomachic, antinauseant, sweat-inducing to treat fevers, culinary spice.  Cautions:  This plant contains small concentrations of aristolochic acid, which is a potent nephrotoxin.  Large doses of wild ginger can be damaging to the liver and kidneys and can readily cause emesis (puking).  Therefore the plant is considered a low to no-dose botanical.  It is, however, extremely comely in the moist, richly leaf-mulched forest garden, companions favorably with goldenseal, cohosh, bloodroot, etc. and worth growing just for that.  Very nice along waterways and will even grow within the stream bed.    Nestle the plant down into the mulch of shade garden or forest, with the roots firmed into the mineral soil and the entire planting well-mulched with rotted leaves.

Potted Plant, certified organically grown

 

 

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  1. Question

    Breanna

    I am conflicted with the low to no-dose stament when the above says it is a culinary. My question is can it be used in place of store bought ginger. We don’t use ginger at home but I would like to start.

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    Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hi breanna, not only you are conflicted but the herb is too. some people do make tea out of it and the heat may reduce some of the harmful effects of aristolochic acid. But the rest of us do not ingest this plant, it is not the same as culinary ginger (Zingiber off.). r

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      Something wrong with this post? Thanks for letting us know. If you can point us in the right direction...

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