Figwort (Scrophularia nodosa), packet of 100 seeds, organic

(1 customer review)

$3.95

Family:  Figwort (Scrophulariaceae)

Hardy to Zones 6 to 9

Herbaceous perennial native to Europe.   Traditional usage (TWM): tumors, wounds, and other afflictions of the skin.  Low dose botanical. The plant is highly colored and handsome, a big attractor for diverse pollinators and a favorite of hummingbirds.  Small seed best sown on surface of soil and pressed in hard, kept moist until germination. Work up in pots and transplant out to 1 to 2 feet between the plants.  Flowers to 2 feet.

100 seeds/pkt., Certified Organically Grown

In stock

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What others are saying

  1. Jennifer

    Figwort

    Jennifer (verified owner)

    Thank you!! Everything germinated. I am really looking forward to this plant growing in our field this summer!

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    • One person found this helpful
      Diana

      Diana

      Hi Jennifer,
      Thanks! I’ve always enjoyed having these in our fields, too, although they have gradually reduced in numbers over the years. Thanks for the reminder, I need to propagate figwort, it is growing in popularity.
      Richo

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    • jenniferjoray (verified owner)

      After growing Figwort and seeing the tremendous response from our native pollinators, I’ve decided to increase the amount of plantings available to them by planting more next season! It’s a slow-growing transplant, so I’ve been patiently bumping-up my Figwort from 128-cell trays, which they began in, to 50-cell trays. They loved being separated to one per large cell once they got to thumbnail size, and took readily to being transplanted! Incredibly strong plant for the size of the seed and for what one would think based on how slowly they initially grew. Love it. Will grow more next season!!! Plus, the smokey, bitter scent was intoxicating and like nothing else I’ve encountered. Great for bridal bouquets, boutonnières, and arrangements in our organic wedding flower farm business.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Jennifer,
      Me, too, I’m growing more figwort this year after a long lag. It’s true, they nourish native pollinators (especially beneficial wasps) very actively. You are too kind with the words “smokey, bitter scent.” I had a visitor come out a decade ago who asked, “What’s the little stinker?” And of course, he was talking about figwort. Have you ever looked at the rhizome it makes? Spectacularly cosmic. Richo

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