Essential Medicinals, 16 full color medicinal herb seed packets, organic

$34.95

Consists of 16 full-size 100% organic color illustrated seed packets in a bundle, a kind of “Lifeline Light” in color!  These are some of the best choices for an all-around useful and beautiful medicinal herb garden.  This collection makes an inspirational gift for your favorite herbalist, and will be appreciated.  It is the gift of life, the gift of light, a true connection to the healing ways of our ancestors.

Astragalus (Huang-qi)
Orange Calendula
German Chamomile
True Comfrey
Echinacea angustifolia (Narrow-leaved Coneflower)
Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)
Elecampane
English Lavender
Feverfew
Hyssop
Marshmallow
White Sage
Self Heal
Temperate Tulsi (Holy Basil)
Valerian
Yarrow

16 full-sized color seed packets, Certified Organically Grown

 

In stock

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  1. Question

    Michelle Locher

    Hi Richo,
    I am in zone 5b in northern New Mexico. I think i may be able to grow all these outside in the garden except for the white sage which I probably should grow in a pot so I can bring it indoors in winter as we have pretty cold winters with a lot of snow sometimes? I also read somewhere that white sage dorsn’t do well in a hoop house. IOs that correct. Please advise… thank you in advance…:)

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Michelle, i do think this is quite possible and as with any gardening endeavor I’m sure it will have its ups and downs. (we revel in the ups and learn from the downs!) As for White Sage, it doesn’t do well under snow cover and this would not be typical to its native habitat. Anybody can have trouble growing it anywhere, really, so if somebody said it didn’t grow well in a hoop house that is undoubtedly true, but certainly shouldn’t be extrapolated to say the plant doesn’t like hoop houses. Anything of that nature can be very helpful (keeps the snow off for one thing) and you really have to concentrate on the substrate. If you’re not providing good drainage and a thick mulch of coarse, sharp sand then your plant will suffer. I often grow these as annuals, starting seeds right after winter solstice, transplanting to sandbeds after last frost and harvesting prior to first frost. I get very large plants in a field grow-out situation. richo

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  2. Question

    Barbara

    What zone are these for? I am 6A

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Barbara,
      Zone 6 is really good for most of the standard herbaceous perennial medicinal herbs, which is mainly what comprises “Essential Medicinals.” These were chosen not only out of utility but also adaptability and ease of cultivation. You can check the individual monographs for zone recommendations. They all differ a bit.
      Richo

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    • Hannah (verified owner)

      Do you think you can grow these without a greenhouse? I am in 6b, southern Indiana.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Hannah, None of these need to be grown to maturity in a greenhouse–they are all temperate species that do best when grown outdoors. Greenhouses will help protect seeds while they are getting started, and many of us work up plants in the greenhouse before transplanting out to the garden, but if you’re used to sowing seeds directly in the garden, and you have a good weed-seed-free seedbed, then of course you can just start them directly in the garden. It makes sense to use the nursery bed technique, where you sow the seeds in close rows in a bed and work them up to seedling size and then transplant into the final location. For more info on this, read my book “the medicinal herb grower.” richo

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  3. Question

    Sasha

    Hi I very much want to grow a medicinal garden. I grow some herbs now but want to add some specific ones. Unfortunately I’m way south in Florida zone 9b-10a is it even possible to grow these different seeds here? Also, I was wanting to try some of them like the echinacea in a pot until I move is that possible as well? if you recommend any others that would grow good in my region let me know please! Thank you!

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    • 2 out of 2 people found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Sasha, Since “essential medicinals” are chosen for temperate gardens and you’re for all practical purposes in the tropics, then it would make sense to buy single packets of the things that work well in hot and moist climes. Yes, almost all of us start plants out in pots and work them up over time and eventually, usually, plant to the garden. Some of the plants that will work well for you (better for you, actually, than for someone in the temperate states) would be Ashwagandha, Spilanthes, White Sage, Tulsi and Passionflower. These any good gardener can grow from seeds. If you want to buy some plants, get Gotu Kola and Brahmi. These will work well for you. Richo

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  4. Question

    Kat

    Where are these seeds being sent from & by which company. Approximately how long to reach Margaret River, Australia please.

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    • Mayche Cech

      Mayche Cech

      Hi Kat, You are on the Strictly Medicinal website. It is us, the Cech family, growing, packing and shipping seeds from Southern Oregon in the USA. We give fast turnaround and AUS customs usually doesn’t hold shipments for too long. Could take 2 weeks total, more or less. Richo

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  5. One person found this helpful

    Question

    Megan

    Are these beginner friendly herbs?

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Megan, Yes, it is one of the hallmarks of herbalism that the easiest herbs are the best herbs. Richo

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    • One person found this helpful

      Megan

      Thank you for the reply, I’m in zone 6b as well, is it still a good time to plant?

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    • 2 out of 2 people found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Megan, This depends on your facilities. If you have a greenhouse, even an unheated one, you can start all these in pots now and they will get big enough to overwinter (dormant) in the greenhouse. If you have access only to a garden plot, then seed them in the spring.
      Richo

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    • Nathan Jamerson

      I am new to this and like a phrase I once heard, “I don’t know enough to say, ‘I don’t know’ “.From watering, to lighting, to anything else that I wouldn’t know or think to ask about, what would I need to do to start growing in my basement? Or would I even want to, for that matter? Ahead of time, thank you for any and all help.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Nathan,
      Thanks for contacting. From humble beginnings almost anything can grow. I suggest you find a community garden or other outdoor plot of soil to grow on. That will be much more self-explanatory and less equipment-dense than growing in the basement. In the meantime, you might read “The Medicinal Herb Grower.”
      Richo

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    • Michelle VALDEZ-CLENNY

      I am in zone 8b. What kind of seeds could I plant and when is a good time to do so?

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  6. Question

    Natalie Mathews (verified owner)

    Hi Richo!
    My calendulas from this pack have grown very well! but i do have a question – why is each plant making slightly different flowers? the seeds, leaves and plants are identical, but some have more petals/larger centers/etc, and are different colors of orange and yellow (as expected). Some look more like marigolds, others more like gerber daisies. this is totally fine, as the tea i make from them doesn’t need to be perfect or exact. I was just wondering if you included many varieties in the same package? If so, which ones?

    Thank you so much!

    Photo has been removed

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Natalie, I think what you’re describing is just healthy variation in an open-pollinated calendula population. Richo

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  7. Question

    ddchey

    Can you tell me which Hyssop is included in this Essential Medicinal Collection?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hyssopus officinalis

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  8. Question

    Sienna S So

    Hi Richo, I’m looking at ordering medicinal herbs. I’m in Zone 7a. is it too late to start perennial medicinal herbs? Thank you in advance 🙂

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Well, as someone who lives in a Zone 7 and plants medicinal herb seeds in every month of the year, I would say it is never too late. Planting times for annuals are perhaps more critical. Always satisfy the stratification requirements of the perennials–any advice on this is given right on the packet–and good results are sure to follow. Essential medicinals are all very easy germinators. Richo

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    • Diane Early

      Richo, I’m in GA zone 8a unless zoning has changed. Will this collection work?

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Diane, Yes, this is our most core set of medicinals that is good throughout the temperate USA. The seeds are grown here in Williams, Oregon which is the same Zone that you are in.
      Richo

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  9. Question

    Chanel A. Miller

    I am looking to start an herb garden. I live just outside of Cortez, CO would u recommend this or your Lifeline medicinal seed pack to start with?

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    • 2 out of 2 people found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Chanel,
      Both collections have plants that will do fine in Colorado. I think its more about which species you’re interested in. Essential Medicinals really is a good start, though. Richo

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    • Jessica

      Hello Richo,
      I’m hoping to start my own medicinal herb garden but am limited to container planting right now. will all of the packets included work well in a container? Thank you.

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    • 2 out of 2 people found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Jessica, I think all of us tend to start mother plants in containers and keep them there, or introduce them to the garden when opportunity arises. Essential Medicinals do well in containers–I always start them that way. If one desires to keep the plants on into maturity in a container, one to 3-gallon size containers will be needed, and potting soil should be changed out every 6 months or so (obviously not right when the plant is flowering, but rather in spring, and then again after cutting back in summer). I do get a ton of inquiries about container gardening of medicinals, and have seen some significant successes with doing this (like Saint John’s Wort flowering from a pot on a fire escape in Chicago). Plants are happiest when growing in the dirt, though. If you have to keep them in containers, make sure to have good air flow and as much sun as possible. The larger containers are good, but start small and work up, as the laws of backpressure are often relevant. Water deeply, and only after the surface becomes dry.
      Richo

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