Corn, Painted Hill Sweet Seeds, Organic

$3.95$12.10

Family:  Grass (Poaceae)

Annual. 75 days and ongoing.  One of the advantages of this variety is that it ripens early and remains pick-able for a long period of time thereafter.  In one trial we planted May 6 and began eating hearty corn on Aug 8, a 92-day induction period.  A multicolored sweet corn that does well growing in cool soils and short-season areas, also performing fine in warmer zones with longer growing seasons.  Stalks 6 feet tall, ears 7 inches long, often more than one ear per stalk, kernels multi-colored red, purple, blue, yellow and white.  As a fresh sweet corn, the appearance of the kernels is less intense, and the color intensifies on drying.  This is a good, hearty, sweet, sweet corn that can also be dried for later use in soups and cornbread.  Corn prefers rich soil and full sun.  Moderate water.  Plant 1/2 inch deep and thin to 10 inches apart.  Side dress with chicken manure after the plants attain 6 inches or so.  Cultivate often to soften soil around plants and push the soil up around the stalks as they grow, to improve resistance to wind.  After the plants reach knee high, you can cultivate and weed them one more time and then scatter crimson clover seed under them.  The pictures illustrate.  The clover will cover the soil, feed the corn with nitrogen, and make it so you don’t have to weed again, all the way through to harvest.

Packet contains 50 seeds, weighing ~10 grams

100 g contains ~500 seeds

Certified Organically Grown

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  1. One person found this helpful

    Question

    Lee Ann

    Just curious, why Crimson Clover? I am new at using clover for this purpose and am wondering if there are greater advantages to using Crimson vs. Red? Also, I am in the central Oregon maritime ecosystem and am wondering if you can make suggestions for growing corn in an environment that rarely ever reaches over 65 degrees all summer? Some say to plant earlier?

    Thank you so so much for all you are doing:-) Lee Ann Kowal

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Lee Ann, Last question first. Still 4 packets left of “who gets kissed” sweet corn: This variety shows vigorous growth in cold soils and gives excellent husk protection to the well-filled rows of seeds.

      Crimson clover is fast to germinate and grow and is annual, not perennial. that is why it is customarily used to undersow to corn. I didn’t invent this–it is a well-tried practice that relies specifically on this type of clover.

      richo

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    • One person found this helpful

      Lee Ann

      Thank you once again!!! I purchased the last seed pack:-) The other three were already gone by the time I read your email and quickly went to purchase…Thank you for the info regarding Crimson vs. Red clover as well. We are so very blessed to have you and your team to help us come up to speed with sustainable food and medicine. Forever grateful! I’ve been hurriedly buying and planting your seeds and plants over the past year and all are doing awesomely!!!!! Lee Ann

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    • Jenna (verified owner)

      Hello! I have a question. Did you let your painted hill sweet corn dry out completely and turn brown in the field before you hung it up? Just wanting to make sure I can do this to preserve mine! Thanks.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Jenna, We ate some of it as sweet corn and left the rest to field cure. That means you stop watering it and let it dry on the stalk. This is the most efficient way of drying corn, if it can be done successfully, that is if the field is dry enough and the raccoons aren’t eating it up. Before the fall rains, remove the corn from the stalks, shuck it, and then, yes, lay out on screens under cover to dry down completely before shelling. Or if you have only a few ears, hang them in bunches indoors. Richo

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