Calendula, Orange (Calendula officinalis) seeds, organic

(5 customer reviews)

$2.95$214.00

Family: Aster (Asteracea)

Annual.  40 to 50 days to maturity.

(Pot Marigold, Orange Calendula) Native to southern Europe, flowering orange to 18 inches tall.  Traditional usage (TWM): antiseptic, inhibits inflammation, promotes healing.  The flowers, when boiled, yield a bright yellow-orange dye. Sow the seed directly in the garden in the spring, or grow as a container plant.  Space plants 6 inches apart.  These flowers are the color of the rising sun.

Packet contains 50 seeds
5 g contains ~ 600 seeds
10 g contains ~1,200 seeds
100 g contains ~12,000 seeds

Certified Organically Grown

 

PS on Calendula seed germination.  Have you ever noticed how calendula volunteers with fall-strewn seed germinating and growing in the spring?  If you take care of those volunteers, they really do make great plants.  Anyway, this means that calendula seed is loaded with germination inhibitors–otherwise the fall disseminated seed would germinate immediately in the fall, and it doesn’t.  So, when planting calendula, make sure to sow the seed early enough in the spring to mimic this natural process.  Allow the seed to be in the soil, cool and well-watered, starting as soon as your ground can be worked, and you will see good results.  Even seed sown midspring and kept nice and moist usually germinates fine.  However, if you plant the seed late in the late spring to summer and it gets really warm and possibly not as moist as it needs to be, you may get a zero germ on it.  That’s all I’m saying.  Richo

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  1. Question

    Nikki

    Calendula seeds grew beautifully in South Florida! Thank you. However they’ve definitely attracted aphids and I’m having trouble keeping them away. Do you have any recommendations for companion plants?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Nikki,
      I guess everything loves Calendula. You can try the temperate tulsi–I often see ladybugs on that plant and ladybugs do eat aphids.
      Richo

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  2. Question

    Kerry Keel

    Just found your site. I see a lot of information about medicinal plants, of which I am VERY interested. I live in south eastern Alabama, what would I need to produce a useful, general purpose garden of medicinal plants? I am thinking of common, and maybe some not so common needs people have because of sickness, or other common issues people have, such as sores, insect bite, sting, burns, aches and pain, to air/water borne diseases.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Kerry,
      Well, Calendula is the best place to start. Beyond that, Saint Johns Wort, chamomile, valerian and comfrey. You probably already have many of the essentials–yarrow, burdock, dandelion, plantain and self heal nearby. If you don’t, then those are good suggestions as well. Check our LIFELINE seeds or SURVIVAL or ESSENTIAL MEDICINALS or indeed any of the hundreds of useful varieties you can locate at http://www.strictlymedicinalseeds.com
      we also suggest you read “making plant medicine” for the standard types and “growing at-risk” for the rare types.
      Richo

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  3. Question

    Rondi

    What is the difference between Succus extract and Calendula extract?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      A succus is basically a preserved juice–you grind up the fresh flowers, press them out in a tincture press and preserve back with a little alcohol. The extract you’re thinking of is probably Calendula tincture, which is best made from the dried flowers ground up and macerated with alcohol and water. Read “making plant medicine” for more info on all this. r

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  4. Question

    Steve

    Hi. Which Calendula is best for medicine?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hi Steve, Any of the 3 cultivars we have available in seed form are equally useful. You just want to avoid the “pacific beauty” type cultivars and you’ll be fine.
      Richo

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    • Carrie

      Why avoid Pacific beauty?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      low resin content

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  5. Question

    judy keating

    will this grow on the central coast of CA (inland)

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hi Judy,
      Calendula grows almost anywhere. We recommend to plant directly in the garden as they are very sensitive to transplant.
      Richo

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    • Janet

      judy keating I have been growing them in the Central Coast (Inland] for years now and they do beautifully ?. Seems like they have been blooming all winter long.

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hi Janet,
      Yes, that’s the etymology of Calendula, blooms during every month of the “calends” (calender).
      Richo

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  6. 1 out of 2 people found this helpful
    Marie Irene Knoll

    Marie Irene Knoll

    100 % satisfaction. Absolutely love this company.

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