Boneset (Eup. perfoliatum) seeds, Organic

$3.95$10.00

Family:  Aster (Asteraceae)
Hardy to zones 4 to 9
Herbaceous perennial flowering white to 4 feet.  Native to Southern and Eastern US.  Large and showy, bearing masses of long-lived, white flowers. Dried leaf and flowering tops, intensely bitter, may be made into a tea or tincture to treat colds and flu. Plant prefers part shade to full sun and moist soils.  Sow seed on surface, tamp in, and keep evenly moist until germination. Usually takes between 1 and 3 weeks for germ.  Spotty germination is normal. Space plants 2 feet apart.

Packet contains 100 seeds
1 g contains ~500 seeds
seed is Certified Organically Grown by Oregon Tilth

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  1. Question

    Megan Olmstead (verified owner)

    Will this plant readily hybrizide with other Eupatoriums? There many different wild species growing around here.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Megan, No, Eupatorium perfoliatum does not readily hybridize.
      richo

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    • Jil

      Hi Richo,
      I can only grow mine indoors. I have full sun from South facing windows. Any advice on making these little ones healthy and strong? Thanks!

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Jill,
      That is going to be difficult, boneset is a wild weed that really wants to be outdoors. I suppose one would give standard indoor culture, with plenty of air circulation. r

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    • Shivani Spirit

      HI Richo. What is the spacing of Boneset? How tall does it get? Thanks Shivani

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Shivani, it’s a medium-sized and upright plant. Normally I see these about waist-high but they can get taller. Most growers put them at 2 foot spacing or so. Richo

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    • Shivani Spirit

      Thank you Richo!!! I appreciate all the great info you provide-Always!

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    • bugz (verified owner)

      Hey there Richo, Do you think that seeds i planted early this spring might have a chance to pop up next spring? i planted boneset and blue vervain and marshmallow and holly hock… and not a one peeked there little selves up. I’m pretty sure i have all the right conditions going around here… we did have a very weird spring with some late frosts… Curious what you think.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hello there, blue vervain and hollyhock can definitely be slow to germ and they can remain dormant in the seed bank for years. Boneset and marshmallow can, too, for that matter but they normally germinate very quickly. Sometimes it takes a few tries to hit it right. Keep planting. Richo

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    • Lindy Biggs

      Wondering if I could put some boneset seeds out this fall, they are going to seed now in my area (Vermont); I thought it might be their natural time to reseed. I know this should be a perennial but I’m not seeing plants this year where they were last year, is that common? Thanks, Lindy

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hi lindy, you can sure try that and it might work. i personally start it in more controlled conditions and transplant. it is possible that the area is too dry, and this can affect overwintering and perennialization of boneset, which is really a wet soil lover. richo

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    • Lindy Biggs

      Thanks so much for you speedy answer. I’ll do what you do and plant in the nice wet areas I have. I assume that if Joe Pye grows there that Boneset will too.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      yes, they are cohabiters of wetlands. and if you’re in Alabama, yes, actually, there is still time to plant perennials. flowering would be next year. r

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Lindy, Since you’re in vermont, start boneset in the spring. richo

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