Ashwagandha, Vedic (Withania somnifera) seeds, organic

(5 customer reviews)

$3.95

Family: Nightshade (Solanacea)

Hardy to Zones 8 to 12 , otherwise grown as an annual, 200 days to maturity

Evergreen or herbaceous subshrub, Native to Africa, India, Middle East and Orient. Traditional usage (Ayurveda):  energy and sexual tonic. Plant prefers full sun, fast-draining, alkaline (pH 7.5 to 8.0) soil and dryish conditions.  Sweeten regular garden soil with ground limestone.  Light dependent germinator.  Sow in early spring indoors or in the greenhouse.  Average germ time 15 days.  Space 1 foot apart–grows 2 to 3 feet tall, producing eventually the lantern-like pods enclosing the pea-sized fruits, green at first and becoming bright red as the inflated calyx dries and becomes transparent.  Pretty little winter cherries.

Packet contains 100 seeds
1 g contains ~1,000 seeds
5 g contains ~5,000 seeds
10 g contains ~10,000 seeds

Certified Organically Grown

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5 out of 5 stars

5 reviews

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What others are saying

  1. Barbara Henderson

    Good germ and fast growing

    Barbara Henderson

    These were easily grown from seed with almost 96% germination, though at different times. So far, they have transplanted well and I look forward to seeing how they fair in container culture.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Barbara,
      Yes, thank you, grown by us, and the seed germinates better after aging for awhile.
      Richo

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  2. Question

    wilson

    Ola amigo. sou wilson. moro no brasil. voce tem como vender para mim? obg

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Sinto muito não poder enviar-lhe os

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  3. Question

    Katherine Adams

    What are the differences between the African and Vedic? does one have more vigorous root growth, medicinal value?

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    • 2 out of 2 people found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Thanks for asking, Katherine. The African ecotype was collected during my 2009 seed collecting journey in Kenya. The plants are larger and more robust than the Vedic ecotype, which comes from India (just across the Indian Ocean from my collection site). Locals in Kenya use this plant for treating sexual exhaustion. We subsequently tested both types for total withanolide content and the vedic came up with a higher withanolide content. I’m offering both types in the spirit of diversity. I wish I had more types to offer, there are many.

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  4. Question

    helena marcus (verified owner)

    Hi Richo, When is the best time to harvest ashwagandha root? Can other parts of the plant be use medicinally? Would you recommend making a tincture out of the root or just storing the root in powder form? Thank you very for your council. Helena

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Helena, In temperate gardens up to Z8 we’re pretty much obligated to dig the roots in the fall, preferably before first frost but in any case before the root freezes. Freezing denatures it. Standard processing wash/slice/dehydrate/powder when needed. Drying the root detoxifies it. Other parts of the plant generally not used. All this is “Making Plant Medicine” which I do recommend.
      Cheers,
      Richo

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    • Michael

      Hello Richo, I am getting ready to harvest my ashwagnadha roots in the next few days, I read here and in “Making Plant Medicine” that the roots should be dried prior to use to detoxify it and reduce side effects. What compounds are being removed in the drying process? Thanks, Michael.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      withanolides

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  5. Question

    Stefanie

    I originally got my seeds from y’all last year which I had almost 100% sprout. I am saving my seeds now. The seeds are extremely oily. Is there any special processing needed or just patience as they dry?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Stefanie,
      Thanks for contacting. The best way to process ashwagandha berries for seeds is to put the fresh berries in a blender with enough water to assure a vortex, then whip it up for half a minute or so and pour the lot in a bowl. Add more water, stir briefly, let it settle for a few seconds, then pour off the water, the fruit, the floating seeds and all other undesirables and leaving the pure viable seed in the bottom of the bowl. Do this a couple of times until the seed is pure, then pour the wet seed off into a screen and dry and stir for a few days, then plant or store. Ashwagandha, like several other nightshade plants, increases in germination for some years as it ages. The oily residue that is formed when seed is allowed to dry in the fruit is germination-inhibiting. Just plant more, you’ll get some plants. If you want more information on the seed flotation process and general info about seed saving of medicinal plants, read “The Medicinal Herb Grower.” Cheers, Richo

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  6. tsakanias

    tsakanias

    seed of indian ginseng or withania somnifera

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