Artichoke, Globe (Cynara scolymus) seeds, organic

$3.95$26.10

Family:  Aster (Asteraceae)

Hardy zone 6 to 12, often grown as an annual maturing in 120 days.

Native to Southern Europe.  Produces large size, edible globes, flowering purple to 5 feet.   Plant prefers full sun and nitrogen rich soils.  Sown in the spring, the large seeds are rewardingly dependable and fast germinators.  Thin or transplant to 2 feet apart.  Add more compost around the plant during the growing season. We note that this select organic cultivar of globe artichoke may be seeded in the early spring and will produce edible globes by fall.  In warmer zones (6 and up) I would expect these to overwinter, in which case edible globes are produced in the late spring of the second year.

Packet contains 20 seeds
5 g contains 100 seeds
10 g contains 200 seeds

Certified Organically Grown

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  1. 3 out of 3 people found this helpful
    Richo Cech

    Admin Richo Cech

    The globes should be picked in the early stages of maturation, and steamed until the scales come easily loose.  Dip in garlic butter or sauce of your own making.

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    • SALLYSHOPPING

      Thank you for your amazing offerings! I am in zone 7b, North Carolina and my globe artichoke plants that I started last spring are thriving here in early January and I am eagerly anticipating flowers in the spring. I have a thin layer of hay thrown over their leaves since we are expecting low 20s overnight this week. Or are they hearty enough to handle it? And if treated well, will they continue blooming multiple years, or are they short lived? Thank you!

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    • 3 out of 3 people found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      I think this should work fine, a thin layer of hay, so as not to drown it. They make a lot of side plants (unfortunate name “suckers” but that is what they’re usually called) and often these take over when the short-lived main crown dies out in a couple of years. Also they do tend to self-seed and somehow those are always the best ones. Like you said, the one that looks good and is overwintering will be your best plant next year.

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