Plants ordered now will ship Late May.

Arnica chamissonis potted plant, organic

$7.50

Family:  Aster (Asteraceae)

Hardy to Zones 4 to 10

(Meadow Arnica) Creeping alpine herbaceous perennial native to the American Mountain West.  Traditional usage (TWM): German Commission E has determined that this Meadow Arnica is interchangeable with Arnica montana for its antiinflammatory effects.  Arnica chamissonis is less elevation dependent than Arnica montana, and yields well from multiple flower stalks.  Planted in loose, acidic loam soil, and given a sunny and moist position, this plant will make a carpet of live roots within a couple of years.  Highly florific when happy.  One of the better herbal bedding plants, as it fills the bed with flowers and remains short.  Space plants 6 inches to a foot apart to get started.

Potted plant, Certified Organically Grown

In stock

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  1. Question

    Laurel Fitzhugh

    I am in the high desert, Prescott AZ. Pine/juniper area. Which arnica will do better?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Laurel,
      I would suggest the “Mexican Arnica” heterotheca inuloides. The true arnica would probably suffer in Prescott unless you were able to supply shadecloth that would increase humidity and soil moisture. Other possible cultural practices that might help you out would be: thick coir mulch (black gold “just coir” or similar product) and of course selection of plants that are native to your area or in general drought-tolerant, such as the Mediterranean herbs. I also received a suggestion from you about the possibility of creating categories of plants that require certain environmental characteristics such as elevation, dryness, etc. and all I can think of in this respect is to filter with the very functional search engine that is on this site–search words like “desert” or “Mediterranean” or even “Boraginaceae” might be very helpful. As with anything herbal, there is information overload and any kind of enterprise is going to require study and experimentation. I recommend “Herbal Resilience” as a good choice for you. Richo

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  2. Question

    WendySue Hagins

    I live in zone 3; will this arnica survive the severe winters here or should I pot it and bring it in the house? Thanks!

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    • One person found this helpful
      Diana

      Admin Diana

      Arnica are accustomed to extremely cold alpine winters and do best when planted to habitat and do poorly if potted up or brought indoors.

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