Alkanet, Oriental (Alkanna orientalis) seeds, organic

(3 customer reviews)

$3.95

Family:  Borage (Boraginaceae)

Hardy to Zones 4 to 11

Herbaceous perennial native to Greece, Turkey, the Middle East, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and South-west Asia.  Soft, forgiving, citrus-scented leaves give rise to dense, mounding, self-mulching tops studded with long-lasting, deeply golden yellow flowers.  An exemplary herbal bedding plant.  Traditional use (TWM): burn remedy, digestive woes, an antimicrobial wound-healer.  Source of antimicrobial and efflux-pump inhibiting compound serothrin.  Plant prefers a full sun position and fast-draining soil.  Seed is a light-dependent germinator and works best when sown in a cold spring greenhouse where temperatures fluctuate from 40 to 60 degrees, night to day.  Press seed into surface of sandy mix and keep evenly moist until germination, which may take as long as 10 weeks but is usually faster.  Space plants 18 inches apart.

Packet contains 30 seeds
1 g contains ~220 seeds
Certified Organically Grown

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5 out of 5 stars

3 reviews

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What others are saying

  1. One person found this helpful
    logan5446

    Spot on description, good germination, hardy even at the seedling stage

    logan5446 (verified owner)

    Grows well in western Oregon with minimal care. Sometimes it wants water, sometimes a bit of nitrogen, but is happily growing in rather poor soil. Research has shown it to help heal up to 4th (but not 5th degree) burns and to prevent infection and help to heal stubborn wounds. Highly underappreciated plant. Grow a few.

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  2. One person found this helpful
    East Joanne

    East Joanne

    Hardy at 7500′ in the arid New Mexico mountains. Beautiful, evergreen (at least to -10) ground cover.

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    • One person found this helpful

      javicmor

      Can the root of Alkanna orientalis, like Alkanna tinctorial, be used as a dyeing and coloring agent, especially for fabrics, soap, and lip balm?

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    • 3 out of 3 people found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Don’t we wish this was the case! Only Alkanna tinctoria has large amounts of Alkannin (the bright red coloring agent that is magically both alcohol and oil soluble). Alkanna orientalis has the anti-MRSA constituents, and the various Anchusas have mucilage, but the only other plant I know of that is a source of Alkannin (albeit very dilute) is Lithospermum, which is also in the boraginacea. Richo

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    • LILA MCCLELLAN

      Is this hardy to zone 5?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Lila, Yes, and we also have awesome plants available for sale if you want to go that route. After studying these extensively for a book I’m writing I am even more impressed with the plant and made a very credible red tincture out of the outer bark of the root. It really does contain palpable amounts of alkannin. Richo

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