Sunflower, Russian Mammoth (Helianthus annuus), packet of 30 seeds, organic

(2 customer reviews)

$2.95

Family:  Aster (Asteraceae)

Annual.  60 days to maturity.

Single-headed sunflowers to 12 feet, with fat flowers to 14 inches across, bearing striped seeds that are the best kind for eating and for feeding to birds. They can be planted to make a living fence, albeit a fence that lives through the summer only.  Striped-seeded sunflowers can also be used for making sunflower oil. This is one of the best oil plants that can be easily grown by gardeners in the temperate north.  Native American peoples extracted the oil by boiling the seeds in large pots, whereupon the oil rose to the surface of the water and could be skimmed off.  Think about it.  How would you do in your household without cooking oil?  It’s an ancient commodity, and it behooves us to maintain the ability and the right to make our own.  Direct seed in the garden after the soil has warmed up in the spring or early summer.  Put sunflowers to the back, as they tend to block access if you put them right in front.  You can plant scarlet emperor beans at the same time, and they will run up the stalks.  Normally sunflowers are thinned to at least a foot between each plant, and the rows are spaced about 3 feet apart.  These Russian sunflowers under the right conditions will grow to 12 feet tall, with large heads filled with the meaty seeds.

50 seeds/pkt., Certified Organically Grown

In stock

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5 out of 5 stars

2 reviews

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What others are saying

  1. Adam Mc

    Awesome size!

    Adam Mc (verified owner)

    I had a very successful one growing on my septic field in my garden, to about 10 foot, the head was about a foot wide, it was fun for kids and visitors, and of course me. Needed a camera on a stick to photo the opening of the head. Waited to harvest but the birds beat me to it and ravaged it in a day! Tried seeds from elsewhere, Strictly Medicinal are the best, thank-you 🙂

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hi Adam, Thanks for that. We’ve really worked hard to get our sunflowers up to par. It has been surprisingly challenging. Yup, the birds tell you when the seeds are ready, then. . . they eat them! Next time try putting a hairnet around the blossom. Thats what we do. Richo

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  2. Ann Mutschler

    Outstanding

    Ann Mutschler (verified owner)

    I must have 100% germination on these. Truly stunning, tall, sturdy, beautiful flowers. Just wow. Covered in pollinators. So thrilled and grateful to have access to such quality seeds. Thank you.

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  3. Question

    Katherine

    What do you use for plant support?

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      The only support I’ve given these is to grow along a fence where they get propped up if they hang over. I find that growing them in a row only a foot between plants often provides communal support. They can actually stay standing to fruition if individualized but sometimes they lodge. r

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    • Ann Mutschler (verified owner)

      This has been a very strong plant for me, however, we have straight line winds that knocked a few of mine over, so next year I will add some support only for that reason.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Ann, Thanks for your positive comments, we appreciate it. Lodging (falling over) is a common problem with tall sunflowers. There is no perfect solution, but some people grow them next to a fence or wall which provides wind protection and support. We took special care to hill our’s up (when weeding, pushing lots of free dirt up around the stalks as the plants develop) this year, and so far so good, although I’m sure gale force winds would flatten them. Richo

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