Sorrel, Sheep (Sheep Sorrel) (Rumex acetosella) seeds

$2.95$303.00

Family:  Buckwheat (Polygonaceae)

Hardy to zones 4 to 8

(Sheep Sorrel, Common Sheep Sorrel) Herbaceous or evergreen, rhizomatous, dioecious perennial with reddish accents to leaf and brick red seeds.  This is the exact species called for in the famous essiac formula.  Plant prefers moist to mesic soils in full sun to part shade and are good grass competitors.  Will grow well on coastal dunes and stabilize them.  Sow in spring.  Barely cover seed and keep warm and evenly moist until germination, which takes about a week.  Space plants 6 inches apart.  Flowers to 1 foot tall.

Packet contains 100 seeds
1 g contains ~500 seeds
5 g contains ~4,500 seeds
10 g contains ~9,000 seeds
100 g contains ~90,000 seeds
1 LB contains ~408,600 seeds

Open-pollinated, Untreated, NO GMO’s

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  1. Question

    Tracy

    Hello. I purchased these seeds from you and need to know when to sow them into the soil outdoors. I live in Prescott, AZ. The last frost date predicted is April 30th, but I don’t know how current that is. We still get temps in the low 20’s at night and 60’s during the day. This changes often though because of our crazy weather this year. We’ve barely had a winter. I don’t want to plant too soon or too late. Any suggestions? Thank you.

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      The sheep sorrel is best sown in warm soils. I suggest planting in a gallon pot and working up to reasonable size before transplanting to garden in spring.

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  2. Richo Cech

    Admin Richo Cech

    A tiny story:  For years I didn’t know that this plant was dioecious, it seemed an unlikely candidate for dioecious-ness (each plant having either male or female flowers, not perfect flowers), being an unpretentious forb of field, garden and shoreline.  One thing seemed a bit odd–as a picker of seeds, I was really curious why one “patch” would have seed and the other “patch” would have none.  After learning that the plant was actually dioecious, it became apparent that my “patches” were actually single plants, spreading out by way of rhizome, making female patches and male patches.  Not only was the mystery of the no-seed sheep sorrel explained, but I came to know just how much this plant really does spread from a single individual!  rac

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