Sage, Dan-shen miltiorrhiza (Salvia miltiorrhiza) seeds, organic

$4.95$32.55

Family:  Mint (Lamiaceae)

Hardy to Zone 7 to 12, otherwise grown as a summer annual or overwintered indoors.

(Tan-shen or Dan-shen, Chinese Red Sage, sometimes misspelled multiorrhiza) Herbaceous perennial native to Manchuria.  This is the official species.  Traditional usage (TCM): circulation stimulant, antistroke, atherosclerosis, menstrual woes.  Source of the molecule known as tanshinone. Plant prefers garden soil, sun to part shade, and regular watering.  The herb itself is comely, with blue flowers that express for quite a long time during the summer, and red roots, which are characteristic to the plant (and several other sages like it).  Excellent choice for herb gardens throughout the temperate north and a show plant for sure.  Sow in fast-draining soil in the full sun.  Gratifyingly easy germinator–sow in spring and work up in pots before transplanting to the landscape. Space plants 2 feet apart.

Packet contains 30 seeds
1 g contains ~540 seeds
5 g contains ~2,700 seeds

Seed certified organically grown

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  1. 3 out of 3 people found this helpful
    appalachiatreecrops

    Growing great in zone 6 Pennsylvania

    appalachiatreecrops

    I purchased seeds and grew them out in zone 7 central Maryland. These plants developed beautiful flowers that the bees loved and even reseeded on the bare ground around the mother plants! I have since moved to south-central Pennsylvania and transplanted them into pots. Even with our brutal winter (2016/17) with minus 2-degree Fahrenheit the plants have started new growth and look unphased. Really amazing plant. Thank you!

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    • Sharon (verified owner)

      Growing in 5b also

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    • Lindy

      I was reading that this plant grows in cold areas in China but your site hardy to Zones 9-12. I see that others are having success in zone 6. Do you know anyone growing it in zone 5?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Lindy,
      Yes, but the person who wrote that, well, do they actually have any experience with the plant or is it just another botanical echo? In my Zone 8b when its a cold winter they expire and on a less cold year they overwinter. I do think it may help to mulch them. Richo

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    • Twilah

      I’m very impressed with this plant. I started this plant indoors under lamps and transplanted it out in spring 2020. It did okay, I think I didn’t water it enough though. I’m in west central Missouri, Zone 6b. It somehow survived a record breaking winter weather in early 2021. There were over six days that were below 10 degrees this February. It even dipped down to -15 for a night. Fast forward to now, May 2021. It is absolutely thriving in the heavy late spring rains. The plants are covered in beautiful purple flowers and the foliage is very robust.

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  2. Question

    Nicole

    If I lived in zone six could this live as a potted plant outside? Also, how long does it take to be able to use the roots for medicine?

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hi there, If potted, then keep outside spring to fall and bring inside for the winter. The roots will be ready by the end of the first growing season. Thick red roots are what you want, if you see these, then go for it. r

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    • Bob

      Looking for a sage to grow in irrigated, leeward Maui garden for teas/medicinal and as a bee & beneficial insect nectar source. Suggestions?

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hi Bob, Sages are usually considered a bit strong-tasting for tea use. I do get good reports from Hawaiians on use of TULSI for exactly the purposes you describe. You might be able to grow some of the California sages which would be cool–purple sage, black sage, white sage–all of these do well in climates that do not freeze–other sages like the most commonly used “tea” sage (garden sage Salvia officinalis) really want a cold cycle–I’m growing all the aforementioned California sages here this year and have had good results with them. Richo

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    • fitzgmnp (verified owner)

      Question about scarifying seed lightly which packet instructs. Maybe I overdid it on first try. How do you scarify such tiny seeds?

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Yes, light scarification, a light touch rubbing the seeds on a medium grit sandpaper or sandstone, not individually, but the whole self-supportive packet worth, all at once. Another option is to use a #7 seed screen, which tends to wake them up.

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    • One person found this helpful

      fitzgmnp (verified owner)

      Thanks so much. I will utilize your technique with my final 10 seeds. have 6 up from the initial 20 so maybe I over (or under) did it. You guys are the greatest for both quality and service.

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Nicole,
      OK, sounds like a plan, sounds like typical germ rate on these, I wouldn’t expect 100% right off the bat, nature hedges her bets.
      Richo

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    • Margaret FitzGibbon (verified owner)

      Does allowing to bloom freely affect root size? I have to treat as an annual in my zone.

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Margaret,
      Sometimes if you cut back the central leader the plant gets bushier and makes more root. Chinese growers are always doing this sort of thing. Richo

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    • Silvia (verified owner)

      I planted them last spring, but when I dug out one of the plants in the autumn the roots were not big enough. This year the plants are enormous, like large bushes. When is the best time to dig the roots for tincturing? Can I do it now or should I wait till autumn?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Silvia, Normally these are harvested for the roots during fall or spring dormancy. If they are enormous now, it is a good time to take care of them and appreciate the flowers and maybe even harvest some seeds. They are slow to go dormant in the fall, but after the first good frost, then dig them. You will get more root that way and it will be better quality than if you tried to dig them now. Richo

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