Echinacea angustifolia seeds, organic

(1 customer review)

$3.95$54.10

Family:  Aster (Asteraceae)

Hardy to Zones 3 to 9

(Narrow-leaved Coneflower) Herbaceous perennial, this ecotype native to the Rocky Mountains of North America.  Angustifolia is the most northerly ranging of all 9 indigenous American species.  Traditional usage (American Indian, TWM): Snakebite, enhancement of immunity, antiinflammatory.    Plant prefers full sun and mesic, alkaline soils.  Amend garden soil with limestone.  Sow in fall or early spring, directly in prepared garden bed or in flats or pots and let the rain, snow and cold awaken the seeds.  Alternatively, give 30 to 90 days cold, moist refrigeration and sow warm.  Thin or transplant to 6 inches to 1 foot apart.

Packet contains 50 seeds
5 g contains ~1,200 seeds
10 g contains ~2,400 seeds

Certified Organically Grown

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  1. One person found this helpful

    Question

    Annie Ryan (verified owner)

    I live in zone 7b and its now April 30th. I just got my seeds. Have I lost the planting window for this plant outside here in Oklahoma? I have clay soil.

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    • 4 out of 4 people found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hello annie, angustifolia will probably do fine in clay, better yet calcareous clay. anyhow, no, plant them right away, this seed has proven high germ and vigor. at this point i would just plant, not try to cold stratify first. r

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    • One person found this helpful

      Jasmene (verified owner)

      Hello I am planning on ordering Ech A. and want to know if i can direct seed them now…or do i need to hold off, i am in zone 7 Alabama, winters are mild temps get down to 20’s and 30 ‘s rarely lower in winter,

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hello jasmene, thanks for contacting. This is a favorite activity of mine, too. We’ve gone from a zone 7 to a zone 8 here due to warming trends. I find it works best to direct-seed in February or March, or as early in the spring as the ground can be worked. This satisfies the cold requirement and gets the crop off to an early start. It is fine to let them be densely planted, they are taprooted and don’t spread out much. at all. weeding in the early spring can get tiresome but is rewarded as the plants size up. our patch had some empty areas due to the sprinkler not keeping the planting adequately moist and so watering frequently during the early stages is advised. once these things get established they tend to perennialize regardless of care. richo

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  2. 2 out of 2 people found this helpful
    Steven

    Like it COLD

    Steven (verified owner)

    Put these seeds into the fridge to cold stratify them on 4/30. Just checked on them and a number of them have already germinated in my dark fridge!

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  3. Question

    Gail Hunt

    How deep do you plantechinacea seeds?

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hi gail, the general rule of green thumb is to plant seeds to the same depth as their width. Echinacea are considered somewhat light-dependent so the main problem is if they are planted too deeply. Sprinkle the seeds on the surface, barely cover them with your planting mix, tamp securely and keep evenly moist. richo

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  4. One person found this helpful

    Question

    Kimmy

    Hi Richo. I want to grow enough echinacea to have ample amounts of root tincture for 2 people, plus some to share. I’d like to have however many plants I need for a 3 year rotation so that I always have enough to make more “next year”, if needed without harvesting all of them at once. Do you have a recommendation of how many plants I should use? Also, is “crop failure” much of a possibility with E angustifolia? Would it be wise to have some E purpurea and E paradoxa as well as a back up? Thanks.

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hi kimmy, if growing e. purpurea, then 20. If angustifolia, then 30. They are easy to grow if you know how. I do think it makes sense to hedge your bets, I know I always do… richo

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  5. One person found this helpful

    Question

    Mary

    I live in the Northeast. If I receive the Echinacea Angustifolia seeds in mid to late summer, do I need to refrigerate them upon arrival until I plant them later in the fall? When do you recommend planting them–September? October? I’m in zone 6b.

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Mary, You can keep the packet in a closed mason jar in the fridge until its time to plant. It works really well to plant Echinacea angustifolia in the early spring to get a good start on the year. Sowing in the fall is OK too if you have a greenhouse to hold the seedling through the winter, otherwise, yes, early spring. richo

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    • David

      Do you think this will grow in central Massachusetts? Specifically Worcester, mass. Thanks

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi David, Yes, this is the most cold hardy of the Echinaceas. Amend the soil with dolomite (ground limestone) under the plants. Richo

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    • One person found this helpful

      George Heston (verified owner)

      Echinacea angustifolia. Unheated greenhouse zone 6b. Plant seed in late fall, cover with straw?

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    • 4 out of 4 people found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi George, with an unheated greenhouse, you can plant Echinacea angustifolia seeds anytime, really, although the fall window (now) and the early spring windows are probably best. There is a weak light dependency involved so I usually just barely cover the seeds, press in hard and expect germination in a couple of weeks. richo

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  6. One person found this helpful

    Question

    Wandalea Walker

    I live in Hawaii at a low elevation & want to grow Echinacea Augustafolia plants for my own medicinal use. I see that these are the most northerly variety but it was always far more effective for me than Purpurea when I lived in Oregon. Do you have recommendations for how to grow it here or another equally effective variety that would like it better in Hawaii? Thanks so much, Wandalea

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Wandalea,
      Thanks for your well-considered question. Echinacea angustifolia is iffy in Hawaii although purpurea seems to grow fairly well there. Basically the main modes of action seem to be 1) antiinflammatory isobutylamides (which are higher in angustifolia than purpurea). These could be provided by growing spilanthes, which is an easy grow in the tropics and makes the same compound. 2) Immune-stimulating bacteria in the roots which again you’re right are higher in angustifolia than in purpurea. these however cannot be supplied by a different plant, that I know of, and even if you grew angustifolia in hawaii it might not sequester the same bacteria that it gets on the temperate mainland. If it was me I’d grow tulsi and spilanthes medicine, combine them as needed, and forget trying to grow angustifolia. Richo

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    • One person found this helpful

      Christine

      Echinacea angustifolia will probably grow just fine in Hawaii. The soil would be great. Echinacea angustifolia grows from the far north to south Texas. You will have to make sure to stratify the seeds before planting. I have stratified by simply putting the dry seeds in the freezer for a couple of weeks. Good luck. You may have to try a couple of times. That is normal. This site has some good information:
      https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/proceedings1999/v4-490.html#germination

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    • One person found this helpful

      lauren

      good day to you Richo!! i would like to know are theses toxic and if so how do you plant it if everything is toxic??!! my baby getting mad at me cause i caint find a non toxic one lol!!

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Lauren,
      Echinacea angustifolia is nontoxic, your baby will be happy. Richo

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    • One person found this helpful

      Jennifer

      I live in utah and have lots of pocket gophers. Do they eat echinacea root? Will it be a bad idea to plant a 1/4 acre with these pocket gophers around

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Jennifer, Thanks for contacting. If pocket gophers are anything like the gophers we have around here, they’re vegetarians and they love juicy roots. I’ve taken to planting larger tracts of plants (including Ech ang) to assure adequate survival after the gophers are factored in. I do have a gopher dog which helps. richo

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