Arnica montana seeds, organic

(12 customer reviews)

$4.95

Family:  Aster (Asteraceae)

Hardy to Zones 4 to 9, best at elevation up to 6,000 feet

Clump forming alpine herbaceous perennial native to the the mountains of Central Europe.  Flowers very large, on long, sturdy stalks. This is the official plant.  Traditional usage (TWM): antiinflammatory.  Standard preparations include tincture, homeopathic, oil infusion, salve and cream.  Arnica montana makes sturdy clumps in the native habitat, and should be planted in moist, acidic soil in the full sun at 1 to 2 feet between the plants, in order to approximate the natural spacing requirements.  We have had some success with growing these at around 2,000 feet elevation, and have received reports of good success from folks living at 8,000 feet in the Rockies. Plant prefers a moist, lime-free, acidic loam soil in part shade or sun.  Does well in rock gardens.  At low elevation, give moist shade.   To cultivate, use standard flower seed planting method, where the seeds are pressed into spongy potting soil and kept evenly moist and cool until germination, which occurs in a couple of weeks.  Light dependent germinator.  Work up in pots before transplant.

Packet contains 30 Seeds
1 g contains ~670 seeds
Certified Organically Grown

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5 out of 5 stars

12 reviews

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What others are saying

  1. Tristan

    Buy Richos "Making Plant Medicine" book

    Tristan

    I was about to ask Richo a question about internal arnica usage and I just remembered I have his book “making plant medicine” which sure enough had the information I was looking for and is a wonderful book but beware he only signed his name in pencil with a heart below on the “growing at-risk medicinal herbs” book, not this one but your experience may differ. Hopefully some more arnica montana seeds/plants will come in stock soon although it appears Arnica, Meadow (Arnica chamissonis) is interchangeable with Arnica montana for its antiinflammatory effects so I may order those seeds for now.

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    • 2 out of 2 people found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hi tristan, just wanted to say thanks for the review, i appreciate it. you can expect something in the mail from me. richo

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  2. Question

    Erika

    Would i be able to grow arnica montana in new jersey Zone 7? I have very sandy soil.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      it is never too late to start perennials

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  3. Question

    Janessa

    I have heartleaf arnica growing all around me. Do you know how this compares medicinally to montana?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hi janessa, they’re all interchangeable. r

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  4. Question

    Graham

    Do you ship seeds to New Zealand.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      we can’t do this successfully anymore, i am sorry

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  5. Question

    Eimi

    Hi Richo,
    I really want to grow Arnica Montana for medicinal use, but I worry it might not do well in Central Texas (zone 8b, 450 ft elevation). Could you recommend a suitable substitute that have similar medicinal properties and heat tolerant? Thank you much in advance!

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hello eimi, thanks for contacting. an easy substitute for arnica montana is calendula. both are daisy family antiinflammatories. Mexican arnica (Heterotheca inuloides) is a really god choice for texas and the plant does resemble arnica montana and is heat tolerant. Arnica chamissonis is the closest in activity and is far easier to grow than montana. you could even try helichrysum which is pretty heat tolerant and does have some arnica-like activity. r

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    • Eimi

      Thank you Richo for the suggestions! Time to do more seed shopping! Which calendula variety would you recommend for my area?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hello eimi, i always recommend orange calendula, it is the best. r

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    • John Wright

      I’m in Roswell, NM with very alkaline soil and would like to grow arnica, any suggestions? Thanks

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hi john, yes, opt for mexican arnica (Heterotheca inuloides). richo

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  6. Question

    Matt

    Where do you source your genetics? I would like to plant a large field to harvest for years to come, and I am trying to get the best plant possible. I also live around 8,200’ in Colorado. Is this strain subtle?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Matt, the germplasm for our Arnica montana originated in the French Pyrenees and is now organically grown. It makes sense for any up-and-coming grower to grow the official species, which is Arnica montana. That way people will trust it, and buy it, etc. There is one small exception, which is that Arnica chamissonis is an accepted substitute (German Commission E) and is easier to grow. But if you’re at altitude, then montana makes sense. Richo

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  7. Question

    Nela Cardenas

    Hi Richo it is possible shipping seeds to Chile? Thanks1

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      hi nela, not really, not successfully. richo

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  8. Question

    Gus Gus

    howdy! if we order 1g of arnica seeds to florida, clearwater beach, would you know on what date it would arrive by regular shipping and also alternately with expedited shipping? thanks!

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Gus, We’re giving appx. 2-day turnaround on seed orders right now, and standard shipping is first class mail USPO. Frankly the standard shipping appears to be arriving just as fast as priority mail shipping, so your most expedited approach would be to order immediately and we will endeavor to give fast turnaround. Richo

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  9. Question

    Spring

    I live in Georgia, is there a certain type of arnica best suited for my area, I’m a zone 7b-8a?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Spring,
      Thanks for contacting us. Probably Meadow Arnica (Arnica chamissonis) is going to be your best choice, in that it is a true arnica and quite heat tolerant. Another option might be Mexican Arnica (Heterotheca inuloides) that proves to be very robust in the South. It isn’t a true arnica but is used interchangeably by many.
      Richo

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  10. Question

    Frankie Hall

    Hi there. I live in Central Missouri. Zone 5. I want to grow the best Arnica for my area. What do you suggest?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Frankie,
      Thanks for contacting! If you’re in the Ozark Highlands then you might get away with growing Arnica montana. If you’re in the plains I would recommend meadow arnica (Arnica chamissonis). Actually an easy grow for those in the know.
      Richo

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  11. Question

    Sarah

    Do sell in larger quantities than just a packet? I notice there is an option for 1g but no dropdown menu. Thanks!

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Arnica montana harvest was limited this year due to drought. we’re down to packets. please order soon, these will sell out. richo

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    • Tasha

      Can I grow arnica at 371ft elevation?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Tasha, Yes, and the Arnica chamissoinis would be an even better (more flower productive) choice. Richo

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    • Mark

      I’m at 3020′ elevation in Western North Carolina, would arnica montana work well here? It can be quite wet, last year was particularly rainy.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Mark, This does sound like a good area for Arnica montana, and we do have some particularly fresh and viable seed in stock right now. I grow it successfully here at 1600 feet in Southern Oregon. Rain is a good thing! You have a lot of acidic soils out there, too, which is also important for Arnica montana. I would grow some Arnica chamissonis at the same time–most people get better results with that species. richo

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  12. Question

    Ingrid

    Companion planting suggestions? I have a badly rocked in space that I suddenly envision as a medicinal rock garden…..

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Ingrid,
      When it comes to medicinal herb growing, rocks can be a great advantage. Some of the plants I see growing in rocky zones where there is altitude and moisture (and I’m headed in that direction because you mention Arnica montana) are angelica, yellow gentian, tibetan gentian, rupturewort, creeping rosemary, yerba del lobo, valerian and yarrow. Check the link for more info on rock gardening
      https://blog.strictlymedicinalseeds.com/where-and-how-to-grow-an-herbal-groundcover/
      Richo

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  13. Question

    Bert Farrell

    I was hoping to grow Arnica Montana in Ottawa Ontario Canada.

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    • 2 out of 2 people found this helpful
      Diana

      Diana

      Hi Bert,
      OK, I think you can do this. remember about the acidic soil, and seeds need some shading to germinate well.
      Richo

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    • edensgrace

      I live in Michigan, with pines and some shading….sounds just like what I was hoping to hear!

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    • Cindy

      I am in western Michigan (Manistee area) and wonder the same thing!! Help lol

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Cindy,
      German Commission E many years ago approved Arnica chamissonis as a functional substitute for Arnica montana, so you can just grow that. We recently used our seeds to produce 400 seedlings that we’re potting up for sale and so I really trust that seed. However the Arnica montana seed is equally viable and the thing to remember about growing the arnicas is that they really abhor lime, so standard potting soils that are pH balanced are no bueno. Use a peat-based soil. 80% peat with 20% worm cast works great. Plant your arnica in a lime-free bed (acidic soils only). There’s really no substitute for arnica so we need to learn to grow it. richo

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  14. Question

    Liz

    do the seeds require stratifcation process?

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    • Diana

      Diana

      Hi Liz,
      They do not. These came up for me this year in standard greenhouse culture. I started them around the new moon and they are now up with the full moon.
      Richo

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  15. Question

    Diane

    I have been told by a very experienced botanist/herbalist that —unlike most herbs— Arnica Montana must be used in its fresh state (as opposed to dried) for full medicinal purposes. I have not found any information to support this theory. Do you have any information of such? Or can you refer me to a resource that may?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Diane,
      Thanks for your note. You can check Making Plant Medicine on page 112-114 for recipes using both the dried and the fresh plant/flowers of Arnica montana. For tincture making, the fresh herb is very nice. The tincture of the dried herb is somewhat stronger. For oil extraction (the oil infusion) the dried plant is preferable, as the water in the fresh herb is inimical to the oil. Richo

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    • Diane

      Thank you so much for the quick reply, Richo. But if the fresh flower will make a more potent oil infusion, could I simply “cook off” the moisture after infusion…or let it settle, and then and separate it manually? I want the most healing benefit I can get.

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Diane,
      The fresh flower does not make a more potent oil infusion–to make a good oil infusion one dries the plant first, so that the oil can extract it, without the plant water getting in the way. I really encourage you to read chapter 10 of “Making Plant Medicine.” I am not the first to make these products, and I am not making this up. There are established methodologies for producing oil infusions and for the most part one uses dried material. Saint Johns Wort is an exception to the rule. Regarding Arnica, the flowers tend to puff out into seeded heads when set to dry. This is why one picks them in early stages of ripeness, and also why one does not worry about fluff in the tincture/oil infusion–the flavonoids and sesquiterpene lactones are still in there. richo

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    • Diane Harrell

      Richo, I purchased two of your books (second hand) and was so excited to start growing arnica, then read this depressing note on a package of seeds…”With the third year, from July on, you can start harvesting and carefully drying the flowers of your Mountain Arnica plants…”. Does it REALLY take 3 years to get useable flowers?!? If that’s the case, I’ll have to buy them rather than grow them.

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Diane,
      The Arnica montana may flower as early as the first year and you can use the flowers any time they occur, you don’;t have to wait 3 years. Arnica chamissonis is easier to grow and makes more flowers that definitely occur in the first year.
      Richo

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    • One person found this helpful

      Diane

      Therapeutically speaking, is Chamissonis -though easier to grow- as potent as Montana?

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    • 2 out of 2 people found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Yes, these were assessed decades ago through the German Commission E monographs and shown to be interchangeable.

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    • Diane

      Great! Good to know! I will try growing both ?

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    • MainnAh

      Thanks for all the info. Does it matter if the flowers go to seed while drying, will it effect the end product potency? I plan on using it topically so flavor isn’t a factor. If this works well with coconut oil I wonder if my infusion method for cannabis would work where you cook the oil, flower, and water together then strain/cool and remove the solid coconut oil that’s infused. That method removes impurities and chlorophyll but I don’t know if it works exactly the same for arnica. If it’s properties are oil based then in theory it should

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello there! you are right, the flowers tend to go to seed when dried. Pick early to keep this to a minimum. It the sample goes to seed on the drying screen, the potency of sesquiterpene lactones remains the same, but the antiinflammatory flavonoids will be diminished. The method you’re describing is pretty specific for cannabis and isn’t usually used for arnica. A lot of activity would be lost to the water fraction, and fast heating at high temps is contraindicated. You can find the time tested method for making oil infusion of arnica and other herbs in my book “making plant medicine.” But in short, digest the dried flowers slowly in warm olive oil with frequent stirring. Richo

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  16. Question

    Rose Hughes

    Will your arnica seeds come back in stock this spring?

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      yes, we will be enabling this shortly

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  17. Question

    Natasha Snide

    Can you notify me when these are back in stock?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Yes, it won’t be long. richo

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    • Kathrina Stahl

      What arnica plant or seeds is best for the tincture you make with vodka the one you take by mouth, kind of like a herbal pain killer, please I need to know, thanks!

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hi Kathrina, I’m not too sure about all this. Herbalists sometimes prescribe Arnica tincture (made of A. montana or A. chamissonis) internally in very small doses and generously diluted in plenty of cold water. But Arnica is usually used externally only. I’m thinking you might have this confused with Wood Betony (Stachys officinalis) which is harmless and more in keeping with the uses you’re describing. Richo

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  18. Question

    Cindy M Koster-Chambers

    Is it poisonous to touch the plant while preparing it for a salve ?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Cindy,
      No, Arnica is not a poisonous plant. It is a low-dose botanical, meaning it does its work at very low concentrations, and in most cases is used externally. If you’re going to rub it on your skin in prepared form, there is little to fear from handling the plant with your hands when preparing it! For a level-headed assessment of handling and preparation protocols for arnica, see “Making Plant Medicine.”
      Richo

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    • Heather

      Hello, would there be any point trying this at sea level, acidic soil, zone 5? Thanks kindly.

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Well, I always try everything and keep going with what survives. It is a vestige of Darwinianism I will probably never jettison. Your best bet is Arnica chamissonis, and we have a large number of very nice plants available, as well as seed. Richo

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    • Diane Harrell

      What is the shipping cost (USPS First Class) within Oregon for one packet of 50 seeds?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      one packet would accrue a shipping cost of $2.90. If you ordered $10.00 worth of packets the shipping would be free.

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    • glenna hemmings

      do you ship to Canada?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      We do indeed–seeds, not roots or plants. r

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    • Courtney

      I live in East Tennessee. Our summers are hot and humid. If I planted these in pots with a good mix (as to avoid our heavy clay) and placed them in a cooler woodland microclimate on our property, do you think they would do ok? I’m thinking part sun here in zone 7. What are your thoughts? Thank you!

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hi Courtney,
      Its not that different from me planting them here, except that our summers are more dry heat than humid. It can be made to work as you describe–use a peat-based mix to increase acidity. As you probably know the Arnica chamissonis is interchangeable medicinally and significantly more adaptable.
      Richo

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    • Courtney Cocke

      Thank you so much!!

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