Arnica montana seeds, organic

$3.95$20.00

Family:  Aster (Asteraceae)

Hardy to Zones 4 to 9, best at elevation up to 6,000 feet

Clump forming alpine herbaceous perennial native to the the mountains of Central Europe.  Flowers very large, on long, sturdy stalks. This is the official plant.  Traditional usage (TWM): antiinflammatory.  Standard preparations include tincture, homeopathic, oil infusion, salve and cream.  Arnica montana makes sturdy clumps in the native habitat, and should be planted in moist, acid soil in the full sun at about 2 feet between plants, in order to approximate the natural spacing requirements.  We have had some success with growing these at around 2,000 feet elevation, and have received reports of good success from folks living at 8,000 feet in the Rockies. Plant prefers a moist, lime-free, acidic loam soil in part shade or sun.  Does well in rock gardens.  At low elevation, give moist shade.   To cultivate, use standard flower seed planting method, where the seeds are pressed into spongy potting soil and kept evenly moist and cool until germination, which occurs in a couple of weeks.  Light dependent germinator.  Work up in pots before transplant.

Packet contains 50 Seeds
1 g contains ~670 seeds
Certified Organically Grown

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  1. Question

    Diane

    I have been told by a very experienced botanist/herbalist that —unlike most herbs— Arnica Montana must be used in its fresh state (as opposed to dried) for full medicinal purposes. I have not found any information to support this theory. Do you have any information of such? Or can you refer me to a resource that may?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Diane,
      Thanks for your note. You can check Making Plant Medicine on page 112-114 for recipes using both the dried and the fresh plant/flowers of Arnica montana. For tincture making, the fresh herb is very nice. The tincture of the dried herb is somewhat stronger. For oil extraction (the oil infusion) the dried plant is preferable, as the water in the fresh herb is inimical to the oil. Richo

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    • Diane

      Thank you so much for the quick reply, Richo. But if the fresh flower will make a more potent oil infusion, could I simply “cook off” the moisture after infusion…or let it settle, and then and separate it manually? I want the most healing benefit I can get.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Diane,
      The fresh flower does not make a more potent oil infusion–to make a good oil infusion one dries the plant first, so that the oil can extract it, without the plant water getting in the way. I really encourage you to read chapter 10 of “Making Plant Medicine.” I am not the first to make these products, and I am not making this up. There are established methodologies for producing oil infusions and for the most part one uses dried material. Saint Johns Wort is an exception to the rule. Regarding Arnica, the flowers tend to puff out into seeded heads when set to dry. This is why one picks them in early stages of ripeness, and also why one does not worry about fluff in the tincture/oil infusion–the flavonoids and sesquiterpene lactones are still in there. richo

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  2. Question

    Rose Hughes

    Will your arnica seeds come back in stock this spring?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      yes, we will be enabling this shortly

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  3. Question

    Natasha Snide

    Can you notify me when these are back in stock?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Yes, it won’t be long. richo

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  4. Question

    Cindy M Koster-Chambers

    Is it poisonous to touch the plant while preparing it for a salve ?

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Cindy,
      No, Arnica is not a poisonous plant. It is a low-dose botanical, meaning it does its work at very low concentrations, and in most cases is used externally. If you’re going to rub it on your skin in prepared form, there is little to fear from handling the plant with your hands when preparing it! For a level-headed assessment of handling and preparation protocols for arnica, see “Making Plant Medicine.”
      Richo

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    • Heather

      Hello, would there be any point trying this at sea level, acidic soil, zone 5? Thanks kindly.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Well, I always try everything and keep going with what survives. It is a vestige of Darwinianism I will probably never jettison. Your best bet is Arnica chamissonis, and we have a large number of very nice plants available, as well as seed. Richo

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    • Diane Harrell

      What is the shipping cost (USPS First Class) within Oregon for one packet of 50 seeds?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      one packet would accrue a shipping cost of $2.90. If you ordered $10.00 worth of packets the shipping would be free.

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