Skullcap, Baical (Scutellaria baicalensis) seeds, organic

(10 customer reviews)

$4.95$20.00

Family: Mint (Lamiaceae)

Hardy to Zones 4 to 8

(Skullcap, Baical; Huang-qin) Herbaceous perennial. Native to the shores of Lake Baikal, Mongolia, Siberia, and the Chihli and Shantung provinces of China. The purple flowers are like schools of dolphin breaking through green waves in a summer sea. The part used in traditional Chinese medicine is the dried root.  Traditional usage (TCM): antiallergic, diuretic, hypotensive, antibacterial, antiviral, tranquilizing and fever-reducing, commonly used for treatment of dysentery, hepatitis, staph.  Source of flavones baicalin and wogonin.  This is one of the best Chinese plants to grow organically in America. Not only is it a very striking bedding plant, bearing one of the nicest flowers available from this catalog, but there is on-going demand for the root, which attains harvestable size after only 2 years. Plant prefers sun and regular garden soils.  It is extremely drought-tolerant.  Sow seed in early spring. Germ. in ~24 days. Space plants 12 inches apart. Flowers to 12 inches tall. As the plants age they become wider, much like humans in middle age, but unlike humans, the seed they produce becomes increasingly viable the older they get.

Packet contains 30 seeds
1 g contains ~560 seeds

Certified Organically Grown

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5 out of 5 stars

10 reviews

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4 reviews with a 5-star rating

  1. Lynn

    Beautiful plants

    Lynn

    I received and planted 3 plants last September. They survived a harsh winter and have grown rapidly this spring into husky, healthy plants.

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  2. Deena

    Amazing germ and good for other plants?

    Deena (verified owner)

    Though this should go without saying, follow Richo’s instructions and you should have great germination rates (I did)! But I’m writing this review because I’ve noticed that the baikal skullcap seedlings I potted in a big tub with chamomile babies seem to be helping the chamomile overcome the transplant shock! These were all planted out at the same time and the chamomile will all do fine eventually, but with the same soil, light, and moisture, it’s clear how much faster the chamomile closest to the baikal skullcap recovered!!! I then noticed that a gaura plant that self-sowed in another (small) container where I had some lateriflora is also KILLIN’ IT!! Though the baikal root is much more muscular (and easier to get a usable harvest from), lateriflora has even higher concentrations of some of the desired phyto chemicals in its roots (you’d just need to harvest a lot more of the relatively dainty lateriflora roots to get it). So anyway- could be a coincidence, but I’d love to hear if others have noticed this??

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  3. One person found this helpful
    BA

    BA (verified owner)

    Did an experiment and started one package of Biacal in starter trays and later one package sown directly into garden…BOTH exceeded my expectations on germination and growth! Many thanks!

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  4. Kristen

    Kristen

    I forgot to rate it, meant to give it 5 stars!

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