Shatavari (Asparagus racemosus), packet of 5 seeds, Organic

$5.95

Family: Lily (Liliaceae)

Hardy to Zones 8 to 12

(Satmuli, Shatamuli, Wild Asparagus, Satawari, Kurilo, Satawar, Asparagus volubilis)  Perennial climbing asparagus native to the Himalayas, occurring at elevations from 300 to 6,500 feet.  Shatavari flowers exude an alluring aroma reminiscent of sweet almond.  They are pollinated by tiny wasps.  The flowers give way to red berries containing the round, black seeds.  In nature, the plant grows in the tropical understory, tuberous roots giving forth multiple twisting stems that climb and cling by way of sharp thorns.  In Sanskrit, Shatavari means “one who possesses a hundred husbands.”  The spring shoots, mucilaginous roots and the leaves are all used.  Traditional usage (Ayurveda): rejuvenative tonic for females, sexual debility, infertility, menopausal symptoms, galactagogue. Source of proestrogenic steroidal saponins, vitamins A, B1, B2, C, and E, Calcium, Iron and Folic Acid.  Plant prefers a south or west exposure and deep, rich soils.  The best soil pH for growing Shatavari is barely acidic (pH 6-6.7).  Sow seeds in rich potting soil in the greenhouse or under lights.  Germination in 35 days.  We have kept these plants for years, planted in deep pots in the greenhouse, providing a trellis for climbing and as much room as possible for the tuberous roots to grow.  Growers in frost-free zones will find this a ready grower in the forest garden.
5 seeds/pkt, certified organically grown

 

 

 

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  1. Question

    Beth Zimmerman

    How difficult would you say it is to grow from seed? Is there anything special I would need to do with these seeds to germinate them? Also, I’m in zone 6b, can I take them in for the winter and use a grow light. Thanks.

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    • Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hi Beth,
      The image was taken just a few moments ago out in the greenhouse, our Shatavari is in bud stage and actually does have some berries on it, as well. Looks like there will be some organic seed coming up. I suggest you buy the packet when the website says it is “organic,” otherwise what you get is material from India that takes a great deal of convincing to germinate. In any case, the standard setup (slatted bench, deep flat, sandy mix, T-5 grow light, planting well-tamped) does indeed yield results. Easy if you know how, hard if you don’t. The plants do well overwintered indoors as long as the nascent buds do not rot. They have been known to reawaken from very dead looking pots roundabout midspring, so never, ever, give up hope. r

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    • Alina Niemi

      It sure seems we have this growing wild in our yard. Is there any other similar plant that I might confuse it with, that would be dangerous to consume? My mother said it was asparagus fern. (I’m in Honolulu.) Mahalo, Rico!

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Alina,
      Thanks for contacting! Even in Honolulu, Shatavari does not grow wild in people’s yards. Could conceivably be introduced. Shatavari has big recurved spines all along the stem. Your mother, as one would expect, is probably right.
      Richo

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