Sage Set (8 seed packets): Black, Clary, Dan Shen (S. miltiorrhiza), Garden, Scarlet, Pitcher, Purple & White [WA NO]

$23.90

Family:  Mint (Lamiaceae)

Set contains one full-sized packet each of sages:  Black, Clary, Dan-shen miltiorrhiza, Garden, Pitcher, Purple, Scarlet and White.  If you are wondering what “full-size packet” means, you can check the seed packets where they are sold individually on this website–they are the same as in the set–the set gives you a substantial price discount over buying the packets individually.

Scarlet is a 90 day summer annual.  Garden is perennial and Clary is biennial, both hardy to Zones 5-9. Black, Dan-shen, Pitcher, Purple and White are hardy to zones 9 to 12.

This is a cross-section of the great variety of Sage species available worldwide. Planting in a sunny, dry and well-drained microsite will help assure survival through the winter. These sages all prefer fast-draining soil in the full sun to part shade.  The seeds are best sown in the spring, barely under the surface, well tamped, and kept warm and evenly moist until germination, which takes about a week.  Each packet contains the individual microsite preferences for the species as well as more specific germination and planting advice.  Enjoy your sages!

Price shown is a discount.

8 full-sized seed packets, Open pollinated, Untreated, NO GMO’s.  Not available to the state of Washington.

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  1. Question

    David Levine

    I was wondering if there was any risk of the sage set cross-pollinating if planted too close together possibly resulting in hybrids. I don’t have a whole lot of space for planting but would love the variety if they can all be grown in relatively close-quarters. I was also wondering the same thing about the Artemesia and Lavender sets. Thanks!

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      This is a good question as Lamiaceae are known to be outcrossers. Generally if they are ascribed to different species you should be fine. Same with lavender. I have seen some spontaneous hybrids in my garden–basils, calendulas, plantain.

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    • computerdave

      Thanks so much for the follow-up! I saw in the Wikipedia entry for Salvia apiana that “It easily hybridizes with other Salvia species, particularly Salvia leucophylla and Salvia clevelandii,” so I figured it was worth asking about. It sounds like the best plan for me would be just to try and keep things as separate as possible, and if Mother Nature decides to deal me some hybrids, maybe I’ll end up with some that are particularly interesting or desirable. ^_^ Thanks again!

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      That is interesting. I do grow all three species and have never seen a cross, but there’s always a first time. Pollinators tend to stick to one nectar source.

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