Pepper, Mboga (Capsicum frutescens) , packet of 30 seeds, organic

(1 customer review)

$2.95

Family:  Nightshade (Solanacea)
~30,000 Scoville Heat Units
Annual.  90 days to maturity.
(Pilipili Mboga, East African Culinary Pepper)  In Zanzibar, where this pepper was selected by indigenous people, they call it “Pilipili Mboga” which means, literally, in Swahili, “Vegetable Pepper.”  These peppers are generally consumed in the green state (their turgid greenness is handsomely accessorized with purple markations), chopped finely and served along with lime, tomato, onion and of course salt.  It is a great, not too hot pepper.  If you pick them very early, then they won’t be very hot at all, and  will taste more or less like a green bell pepper.  If you pick them further along in their maturation cycle, then sure, they get pretty hot, and you want to eat them along with other foods, not by themselves, out in the garden, under the sun, with your mouth burning, looking for a tomato to assuage the pain!  Although this type was originally sourced from Pemba, the peppers are now grown by us on our farm here in Southern Oregon.  The plant is about 2 feet tall, flat-topped, with dark green leaves, large and decorative flowers–a very heavy and trouble-free producer of peppers as per the photo.  The fruits are thin and about 3 inches long.  Here in the mountains of Southern Oregon we find that the maturation of Pilipili Mboga takes about 3 weeks longer than common Cayenne peppers, so if you want red fruit (or seed) it makes sense to get started early.  But frankly, if we can pull off a good crop here, growers in the midwest or in the South will have–NO PROBLEM getting them to mature (our nights are really cold!)  Besides, these are traditionally eaten while still green and technically unripe.  By the way, I looked long and hard for another name to call these peppers, but finally settled on the Swahili–there is no literature available that I know of that gives them any other name besides the Swahili and the Latin. Peppers prefer a scanty, even water supply, good drainage, full sun, and a long, hot summer.  Start indoors 40 to 50 days prior to the last frost.  Thin seedlings to at least 2 inches apart in the flat.  Transplant out to garden after the soil has really warmed up.  Space plants 2 feet apart.

30 Seeds/pkt., Certified Organically Grown

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  1. Lovelace

    My go-to, all around medicinal and culinary pepper

    Lovelace

    Bought a packet from y’all like 3 years ago and I’ve grown this every year. Seriously this pepper has zero problems, bears heavy fruit, extremely versatile in the kitchen and in the medicine chest. Not the most flavorful capsicum in my opinion has more of a pure heat profile in my opinion and they are pretty darn hot when you harvest fully ripe.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello, I read this review with great interest. I have a new crop of “mboga” in the field right now for the purpose of re-upping seeds for this variety. I am attached to this one as it comes from Zanzibar and it was a real trip to get it back here. I have mixed feelings because it is extremely slow to ripen and indeed even in Zanzibar I saw it used more as a hot green pepper vs. a red one, and this kind of goes counter to my usual wishes in terms of ingesting peppers–I like them ripe. Anyhow thanks for letting me know how this is doing for you, and I’m glad you’re happy with it.
      Richo

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    • Lovelace

      For your reference i’m in Zone 7b in GA. I direct sow a few every year in raised beds, water to germ and that’s it. Love you guys, thank you.

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    • Harry Dantzler

      Ricoh, I will be 82 next Friday, and have been with you for a long time now. This is the third time I have ordered your book, because people keep “borrowing” mine and never returning it. I like making my own medicine and have been doing it for years now. I don’t go to doctors. I trust them to diagnose health problems, but not treat them. I haven’t been to one since 1969 when I had a cold, and haven’t been back because I now know how to cure a cold. (s) My grandfather was a Master Herbalist, but he didn’t know it. He just kept curing everyone who came to him sick and they paid him with chickens or some meat from their smokehouse and occasionally with a few coins. That was in St Matthews, SC on a farm I shall never forget. I’m originally from Philadelphia, but have lived in South Carolina since 1977. Never got the farm I always dreamed of, but I’m still young and illness free, so I can keep on dreaming. Keep up the good work my brother.

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Harry, Thanks for supporting us with your purchase of “making plant medicine,” we appreciate it immensely. Sounds like you’re part of a long tradition of herbalists. Yes, at one time self-medication with herbs was the main modality. Nobody thought that much about it, and it was as natural to use goldenseal to treat a cold as it was to put lettuce on the table for dinner. We’re all looking for a return to those days and those good ways. Richo

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