Oregon Grape, Creeping (Mahonia repens), packet of 20 seeds

$5.95

Family: Barberry (Berberidaceae)

Hardy to Zones 4 to 8

Family: Barberry (Berberidaceae)

Hardy to Zones 4 to 8

(Creeping Oregon Grape) Perennial evergreen creeper, widely distributed from Alberta and BC down to Texas.   The plant is highly prized in the shade garden, with shining, compound, holly-like leaves, bearing large clusters of purple berries in the late summer.  Traditional usage:  TWM, antibacterial.  Roots are a source of the alkaloid berberine. Plant prefers loose, rocky and acid soils of hillsides and stream banks or the rich soil found under conifers.  Elevation tolerant to 10,000 feet and quite drought tolerant, as well.  Traditional usage (TWM): antibacterial, liver stimulant, water purification.  Source of the yellow alkaloid berberine.  Plant prefers loose, rocky and acid soils of hillsides and stream banks or the rich soil found under conifers.  We are offering cold stored seeds in order to help speed the typical multi-cycle germination of this species.  Sow anytime, for germination in warm soils.  Allow seedlings to grow for a year or more in nursery beds or in pots, then transplant to permanent location, 2 feet apart.

20 seeds per packet, Open Pollinated, Untreated, NO GMO’s

 

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  1. Question

    ASHLEY MAPLE

    Hello! I was wondering about the cold stratification period for this seed (Oregon Grape). When I received it would I keep it in the fridge or place it outside in a pot? I read it needs cold/moist stratification for three months, followed by warm and moist conditions for three months. We live in zone 7. Thank you!

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Ashley,
      The most reliable treatment is outdoor treatment. Plant in a gallon pot or deep flat, screen over the top to prohibit birds and mice, and leave it in cool, moist shade until the seeds come up. I did this last year with good results! Not so sure about the cold/warm stratification science–I planted mine in the fall and they came up in the late winter. Richo

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