Echinacea tennesseensis, packet of 20 seeds, organic

$3.95

Family:  Aster (Asteraceae)

Hardy to Zones 5 to 9

(Tennessee coneflower) This plant is on the federal endangered species list and growing it from this cultivated seed is an act of conservation.  This is a powerful plant.  Source of alkylamides.  Tennesseensis is easier to grow than Echinacea angustifolia, withstands a more acid/clay type soil, and has (like all the Echinaceas, really) an incredible and unique coneflower.  The ray flowers on Echinacea tennesseensis reflex backward. Plant prefers full sun to part shade and rich, moist soil of garden or woodland edge.  Sow seed in the early spring in flats outdoors or in the greenhouse, and transplant seedlings out to the garden or field in mid-spring.  Space plants 2 feet apart.

20 seeds/pkt., Certified Organically Grown

In stock

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  1. Question

    Dara Douell

    Do you have any thoughts about a variety of echinacea best suited for Colorado, 7,000 feet elevation? Thank you. Dara

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Admin Richo Cech

      Hello Dara,
      Yes, Echinacea angustifolia is native to the Rocky Mountains and would be your best choice.
      Richo

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    • Michelle Beck (verified owner)

      Instructions for this variety say to moist refrigerate for 2 months. Is moist sand adequate or do you have another preferred method? I’m beginning now in order to plant in pots until the weather warms. I’m in West Tennessee zone 7b. Thanks very much.

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    • One person found this helpful
      Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      Hello Michelle,
      Cold stratification is recommended for optimum results. However, I planted seeds on 12/8 to a flat in a cold greenhouse and am seeing germination on 12/30, a 22 day induction period in moderate conditions. I tend to use a slightly more carbon-rich medium than pure sand when starting Echinaceas. I just mixed up a batch of soil that was half-sand and half potting soil and that tends to work pretty well. Fast drainage is always a good idea but some compost seems to help for prairie species. The E. tenn. is from our own production and hand-selected by your’s truly. In a recent series of comparative experiments, it was the first to flush among 5 spp.
      Richo

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    • Michelle Beck (verified owner)

      I think I’ll try both methods. Thanks so much for your help!

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