Chamomile, Saint John’s (Anthemis sancti-johannis), packet of 50 seeds

$3.95

Family:  Aster (Asteraceae)

Hardy to Zones 3 to 9

(Saint John’s Chamomile, Golden Marguerite, Orange Marguerite, Marguerite Daisy) Short-lived self-seeding evergreen perennial to 18 inches tall, native to the mountains of Bulgaria   This pretty mounding plant with deeply cut, aromatic, fern-like leaves gives rise to multiple stalks crowned by the flattened, golden orange flowers.  Grows excellently on the garden border or in containers.  A fragrant cut flower, the petals are edible and may be used to garnish salads, and the dried flowers are good in pot-pourri.  Sow seed in spring, in pots or directly in the garden.  Press seed into soil surface and keep evenly moist, warm and in the light until germination, which occurs in 3 days to 3 weeks.  Thin or transplant to 1 foot apart.

50 seeds/pkt

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  1. Richo Cech

    Admin Richo Cech

    More information specific to this plant: I did a germ test where the seed was surface sown and pressed in (these are light dependent germinators) and kept moist at 68 degrees F with germ in 3 days. I planted a set of these along a path by the gate at my downtown garden, and they were pretty. Drought tolerant to a T, they spent the first year as cushy mounds and went up into golden flowers the spring of the second year. This would be a good subject for dryland gardening/landscaping, with just as much florific potential as your standard hybrid flowers that you can buy in a plastic 6-pak, and a lot more aroma, history, and longevity on the landscape. RAC

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    • Sarah Arndt

      What are the medicinal properties for this species of Chamomile?

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    • Richo Cech

      Richo Cech

      The petals are edible and used for garnish. Anything with this high of a flavonoid content will tend to be antiinflammatory. There is little info on medicinal uses in the literature.

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