Tulsi, Krishna -- Holy Basil, Shyama Tulasi (Ocimum tenuiflorum) potted plant, organic

Tulsi, Krishna — Holy Basil, Shyama Tulasi (Ocimum tenuiflorum) potted plant, organic

Richo Cech 2 Comments

Family:  Mint (Lamiaceae)

Hardy to Zones 10 to 12, otherwise grown as a potted plant and brought in for the winter

(Tea basil from India, Shyama Tulasi, Krishna Tulsi) Perennial tea basil originally from India.  The plants are grown at our farm here in the USA, in seclusion, in order to produce the seed offered here.  An outstanding cultivar for producing the true tropical-type tulsi tea (as opposed to tea of temperate tulsi).  Leaves dark purple.  Many people prefer this dark-colored cultivar.  According to ancient folklore, the Tulsi (tulasi) plant is a manifestation of the Divine Mother on Earth, for the benefit of all creation.  Tastes good and provides gentle stimulation to body, mind and spirit. Growing tea basils brings many blessings to the household!  The tea made from this plant is very satisfying, with taste and aroma most appealing.   Traditional usage (Ayurveda): stress, anxiety, heart disease, arthritis, diabetes, and dementia.  Drinking tulsi tea in the morning is a fantastic way to get started.  If you want to be an herbalist and are afraid you might tell somebody to take the wrong thing, then tell them to drink tulsi tea and you will be right every time.  Plant prefers a warm garden exposure, with rich yet well-drained soil and frequent watering.  Space plants 2 feet apart.  If growing indoors, give at least 6 hours of light daily, do not overwater, and make sure there is good air exchange to keep the plant healthy.  Space plants 2 feet apart.

Potted plant, Certified Organically Grown

Tulsi, Krishna — Holy Basil, Shyama Tulasi (Ocimum tenuiflorum), packet of 20 seeds, organic

Richo Cech 6 Comments

PLEASE NOTE:  Krishna tulsi seed packets out of stock until the new harvest in fall of 2019.   My recommendation is to plant the AMRITA TULSI which is closely related to the Krishna tulsi.  We still have plenty of stock of AMRITA and the germination is superior.  Richo

 

Syn. Ocimum sanctum

Family:  Mint (Lamiaceae)

Hardy to Zones 10 to 12, otherwise grown as a potted plant and brought in for the winter

(Tea basil from India, Shyama Tulasi, Krishna Tulsi) Perennial tea basil originally from India.  The plants are grown at our farm here in the USA, in seclusion, in order to produce the seed offered here.  An outstanding cultivar for producing the true tropical-type tulsi tea (as opposed to tea of temperate tulsi).  Leaves dark purple.  Many people prefer this dark-colored cultivar*.  According to ancient folklore, the Tulsi (tulasi) plant is a manifestation of the Divine Mother on Earth, for the benefit of all creation.  Tastes good and provides gentle stimulation to body, mind and spirit. Growing tea basils brings many blessings to the household!  The tea made from this plant is very satisfying, with taste and aroma most appealing.   Traditional usage (Ayurveda): stress, anxiety, heart disease, arthritis, diabetes, and dementia.  Drinking tulsi tea in the morning is a fantastic way to get started.  If you want to be an herbalist and are afraid you might tell somebody to take the wrong thing, then tell them to drink tulsi tea and you will be right every time.  Prepare a flat of potting soil or a fine seedbed in spring.  Remember that tulsi is a light-dependent germinator, so it actually helps to hold the seeds in the palm of your hand up to the sunlight to get them started.  Then plant not too deeply, so they still get light. Scatter seeds on surface, press in and keep evenly moist, in the light and very warm until germination, which is rapid.  Transplant or thin to 2 feet apart.

Packet of 20 seeds, Certified Organically Grown

  • for a discussion of morphological variability of tulsi in India, see the research article by Malay, Pandey, Bhatt, Krishnan and Bisht “Morphological variability in holy basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum) from India, Genet Resour Crop Evol (2015) 62:1245-1256.  Cluster analysis techniques were applied to identify three main types (green type Rama, intermediate type (such as our cultivar called Amrita) and black type Shyama (Krishna)).  You can find the comparative photos on page 1251)

Tulsi (Holy Basil) Type Comparisons

How does one disambiguate a subject so complex?  Holy Basil, a plant that is gentle and healing to body, mind and spirit should bring happiness, not confusion! The commonality of all types (species/cultivars) is that the leaves may be eaten fresh, used in cooking, or best yet picked, dried, and made into tea. Taxonomy:  Vana Tulsi (a tree basil) is Ocimum gratissimum.  The …

Tulsi, Amrita -- Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum), packet of 50 seeds, organic

Tulsi, Amrita — Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum) seeds, organic

applegatetech Leave a Comment

Syn. Ocimum sanctum

Family:  Mint (Lamiaceae)

Hardy to Zones 10 to 12, otherwise grown as a potted plant and brought in for the winter

(Tea basil from Amritapuri, an intermediate form*) Perennial tea basil originally from India.  The plants are grown at our farm here in the USA, in seclusion, in order to produce the seed offered here.  An outstanding cultivar for producing the true tropical-type tulsi tea (as opposed to tea of temperate tulsi).  Leaves as shown, green with purple highlights, on a densely-leaved bush.  Amrita has a wonderful aroma and tests for the eugenol marker compound and also tests very high for the anxiolytic compound rosmarinic acid. “Amrita” is sanskrit for “immortality” and is sometimes translated as “nectar.”  Thus “nectar of immortality.”  According to ancient folklore, the Tulsi (tulasi) plant is a manifestation of the Divine Mother on Earth, for the benefit of all creation.  Tastes good and provides gentle stimulation to body, mind and spirit. Growing tea basils brings many blessings to the household!  This is the holy basil my wife and I grow for ourselves to make into tea.  We find it very satisfying, with taste and aroma most appealing.   Traditional usage (Ayurveda): stress, anxiety, heart disease, arthritis, diabetes, and dementia.  Drinking tulsi tea in the morning is a fantastic way to get started.  If you want to be an herbalist and are afraid you might tell somebody to take the wrong thing, then tell them to drink tulsi tea and you will be right every time.  Prepare a flat of potting soil or a fine seedbed in spring.  Remember that tulsi is a light-dependent germinator, so it actually helps to hold the seeds in the palm of your hand up to the sunlight to get them started.  Then plant not too deeply, so they still get light. Scatter seeds on surface, press in and keep evenly moist, in strong light and very warm until germination, which is rapid.  Transplant or thin to 2 feet apart.

Packet contains 50 seeds
1 g contains ~2,200 seeds

Certified Organically Grown

  • for a discussion of morphological variability of tulsi in India, see the research article by Malay, Pandey, Bhatt, Krishnan and Bisht “Morphological variability in holy basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum) from India, Genet Rsour Crop Evol (2015) 62:1245-1256.  Cluster analysis techniques were applied to identify three main types (green type Rama, Intermediate type (Amrita) and Black type Shyama (Krishna)).  You can find the comparative photos on page 1251 of this study.  The photos correspond closely to the types offered here at Strictly Medicinal Seeds.
Tulsi, Vana -- Holy Basil (Ocimum gratissimum), packet of 30 seeds, Organic

Tulsi, Vana — Holy Basil (Ocimum gratissimum) seeds, Organic

applegatetech 5 Comments

Family: Mint (Lamiaceae)

Hardy to Zones 10 to 12, otherwise grown as a potted plant and brought in for the winter

(Vana Tulsi, Clove Basil, African Basil, Vantulasi, Wild Holy Basil, Tree Basil) Perennial bush basil to 5 feet, native to India and East Africa, a wild species brought into cultivation.  These seeds grown at our farm, secluded from other basils.  The plants are woody-stemmed and actually overwinter indoors more readily than the other tulsi types.  I have brought them successfully through a winter, planted in gallon pots on an indoor windowsill.  Source of eugenol (oil of clove).  The plant is handsome and aromatic, slightly hairy, green-leaved.  As a garden grown tea herb, it weighs up heavily and may be used by itself or blended with leaves of other types of tulsi. Traditional usage (Ayurveda): stress, anxiety, heart disease, arthritis, diabetes, and dementia.  Drinking tulsi tea in the morning is a fantastic way to get started.  Tulsi seed is a light-depndent germinator, and you can increase germ rates by holding the seed in the palm of your hand in the direct sunlight before planting.  Prepare a flat of potting soil or a fine seedbed in spring and scatter seeds on surface, then press in and keep evenly moist and warm until germination, which is rapid.  Transplant or thin to 2 to 3 feet apart.

Packet contains 30 seeds
1 g contains ~1,000 seeds
5 g contains ~5,000 seeds
10 g contains ~10,000 seeds

Certified Organically Grown